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Re: LOAD - Golf Tees

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PRSE(--nospam--at)aol.com wrote:

> My question for today:
>
> We are designing a two-level tee line structure for a golf driving
> range.
>  The golfers can walk around up top and drive the golf balls into the
> great
> beyond.  The question has come up as to what is the appropriate live
> load for
> such a case.  The Code does not address it.  Our preliminaries were
> based on
> a 100 psf live load, which is easily justifiable, but the owner wants
> to know
> if we can reduce it.  I've told him that we need the 100 psf at the
> back of
> the tees becasue this is a "exit", but I would look for a reduction in
> the
> tee box areas.  Since the tee areas are cantilevered 12' witha 7'
> backspan,
> the live load is a considerable issue.
>
> If anyone has desgined one of these, and can give us a design load
> precedent,
> I can probably sell that to the Building Department.
>
> Lastly, should I trade my fee for time at the driving range?!
>
> Thanks, and Happy Golfing,
>
> Bruce Resnick
>

We have designed elevated golf platforms in CA like you described with
(as I recall) a live load of 100psf over the back span and 60psf at the
cantilever. Construction was steel tube beams with concrete filled metal
decks. Our larger concerns however were limiting deflections for the
overall structure and at the cantilever (don't want those balls just
rolling off the end). Not being a golfer, I was concerned that overall
dynamic vibrations from the actions may translate to other golfers on
the platform and I imagined these guys and gals looking up my name on
the design documents and pitching balls at my house. I hate to stereo-
type golfers but I'm just a product of the advertising I see on
television ya know.

As for my experience so far, I'm unaware of any complaints regarding the
performance of the structure, but then I've moved to Utah.... Gee, maybe
that's not a good thing to acknowledge........

Barry H. Welliver
wellive(--nospam--at)ibm.net