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RE: CE licensing a different problem

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-----Original Message-----
From:	dennismc [SMTP:dennismc(--nospam--at)dennismc.com]
Sent:	Sunday, October 05, 1997 4:26 PM
To:	seaoc(--nospam--at)seaoc.org
Subject:	Re: CE licensing a different problem

All of these are within the scope of a Civil Engineer practicing
Structural Engineering.  A CE can do a building up to about 13 
stories.
Up to about 20 stories, the design procedures are the same. 
 After that,
the load distribution changes here and there but the member 
designs are
essentially the same as for a low rise building.

I would expect someone professing to practice Structural 
Engineering to
know these things, I used them when I was a Civil Engineer 
practicing
Structural Engineering.

Well Dennis, I stand corrected. I haven't designed anything 
taller than three stories and have forgotten most of my finite 
element methodology years ago. Maybe when the next tall building 
comes my way I'll bone up on my procedures.
Now let me get this right. The SE exam covers information that 
any CE is expected to know in the practice that he is already 
licensed to perform. AND, the only reason for the CE to take the 
SE exam is to grant him the authority to use the skills that he 
already possesses to design buildings over 13 stories and 
essential facilities.
Now, going one step further, if I don't intend to design 
buildings over three stories and I have no intention (especially 
as a one man office) to design schools and hospitals then the 
only reason for me to take the SE exam is to impress people, 
satisfy my own ego or because I am a masochist who wants to 
punish myself for no good reason.
Thankfully I have the common sense not to have my teeth pulled 
just because I might need a root canal some time in the future.
Finally, if as you quoted "All of these are within the scope of 
a Civil Engineer practicing Structural Engineering" then we must 
be structural engineers and you must be in denial.

Dennis Wish