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Re: Stamping Plans - A new question

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Stan Caldwell, are you listening?

Bill Allen
-----Original Message-----
From: wish <wish(--nospam--at)cwia.com>
To: seaoc(--nospam--at)seaoc.org <seaoc(--nospam--at)seaoc.org>
Date: Friday, December 12, 1997 1:19 PM
Subject: Stamping Plans - A new question


>I received a call from a client (an architect) whose client purchased a
>steel stud home designed and manufactured in Texas for use in Los Angeles.
>The home was designed using steel straps for lateral bracing rather than
>plywood shear walls.
>The manufacturer did not provide the foundation analysis and would only
>stamp the plans and calcs for their product.
>The city required another engineer for the installation and design of a
slab
>on grade - no unusual soils conditions here, basic minimum code value City
>of L.A. slab on grade. The architect hired an engineer for the foundation,
>but the engineer would not take responsibility for the structure (and
>rightly so).
>The City refused the plans stating that they wanted only one engineer of
>record and neither the manufacture of the home or the foundation engineer
>was willing.
>
>You can see where this is going. The client has only one choice as I see
it.
>They must hire an engineer to redesign or justify the original design and
>details. Would it be legal for an engineer who agrees with the original
>design and detailing to approve the set even though it was not created
under
>his direct supervision or he was not involved in the original design
>process?
>
>If it is not legal, how do we protect the public or force the out-of-state
>engineer to insure that his product is buildable in another state where he
>may not be licensed?
>
>Any suggestions?
>
>Dennis S. Wish PE
>
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