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Re: Signing mylars or vellums

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Dennis Wish wrote:

>It is my opinion that the use of the word original does not refer to the
>vellum or mylar, but to the drawings used on the job which have been
stamped
>and permitted by the building official - such as original permit set.

This sounds like "creative interpretation" to me.  Historically (before we
had
electronic media) the "original" was the vellum or mylar on which the
linework
was drawn.  If I asked for the original and was given a blueline, I would
wonder what's going on!  I think that the intent is to seal a vellum or
mylar
as the engineer's "original".

On projects I work on (e.g. large municipal water treatment plants), I stamp
the mylars and then submit bluelines (from the mylars) to reviewers such as
the state health department (or a building department).  Then we issue
multiple bidding sets and final construction sets from the stamped mylars.
I
generally don't ever stamp a blueline set.

We usually submit the stamped mylars to the client for their records.  We
always keep record sets of what we've stamped in our files.  If someone
alters
the mylars after they are out of my control (without sealing the changes),
then they are violating the law - but I can defend myself based on my record
set.

As Roger Turk wrote:

>With today's technologies, I don't think that it matters much whether a
>drawing is wet stamped or the original is stamped.  If a person wanted to, 
>he/she could scan a seal, separate out the signature, take the seal and
>signature down to the local office supply store and get a stamp with the
seal
>and a signature stamp and then would be able to "wet stamp" all the prints 
>he/she wants to.