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Re: General Business

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Ah, a true Capitalist! First of all, I don't think my rates are low and I am
concerned that, if I bump them up, those who have a choice will go somewhere
else as soon as the "crunch" time is over. It would reduce my marketing
costs if I can develop long term relationships with clients.

Thanks,
Bill

-----Original Message-----
From: BRBATES <BRBATES(--nospam--at)aol.com>
To: seaoc(--nospam--at)seaoc.org <seaoc(--nospam--at)seaoc.org>
Date: Friday, April 17, 1998 7:38 PM
Subject: Re: General Business


>
><<
><< If I were to hire someone (Option 3 - the least attractive), I would
need
>to
><< hire experienced people. While I have hired inexperienced people in the
>past
><< and trained them, The University of Bill Allen is now closed. At this
point
><< in my life, I am only interested in doing a good job and making money.
><<
><< Thanks for the reply,
><< Bill
><<
>
>Bill,
>
>How about option 4: raise your rates (don't forget supply and demand).
>
>Pricing of any product or service is always a bit tricky, but raising your
>rates will make some work go elsewhere and leave you with possibly more
money
>overall for the remaining hours (and probably the better clients and more
>interesting work).
>
>With all the productivity gains resulting from office automation, internet,
>etc. you're certainly delivering more value per hour and your rates should
>reflect that.
>
>Bruce Bates
>RISA Technologies
>
>
>