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That was another week in general business.

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Dear Patrick,

This was the week where John Donne caused a reaction..

>>>>>>>>
Perhaps you could help with the following?

babyroo(--nospam--at)ozemail.com.au  asked me:

Hi Dad,

I am looking for an internet provider that can be accessed
internationally.
AOL has many access phone numbers but I do not like AOL.  Do you know of
any
others?

Michele
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------

Patrick Quinn
Henderson, Nevada
<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

If one was a cynical Australian living in city where a free enterprise
government is setting the population apart just before an election I would
ask the same question of you about Michele's quote as you asked of mine,  


"John Dunne, but how is it a subject for 6,000 structural engineers?"

but as I am not, I will refrain from commenting or pointing out the level of
non engineering chat that makes this a warm friendly list where people help
each other and like all offices chat and gossip.  Try asking these sorts of
questions in a large consulting office you would be lucky to get an answer
in such short time.  And I think there is a quote about allwork and no play

Also I remember when I first joined the list I was amazed by this lady who
liked Anchovy Pizza.  I knew then that i had found some one who really
understood food and engineering.  And when I used a non engineering quote to
end a response it was the only thing that was responded to.  I have tried a
few engineering quotes and got zip.

I collect quotes for my papers.  this list server has given me several new
ones and a Latin translation.  One quote from the right author can often
save a lot of explaining.



I would suggest the new Communicator from Netscape and its webmail.

>>Doctor's Pay

Doctors get about the same hourly rate as a good senior engineer if in
private practice it is the difference in productivity that is the killer.
They isolate themselves from everything except the problem at hand and then
go for it.

You canna blame them it is the way to make money.  What is always
interesting is why engineers have to be so accessible.  If I could lock
myself away I get a lot more done to.  Try to get a Doctor on the phone.

My family has lots of Doctors in it and so to the kind soul who thought I
was being hard on Doctors I apologize if I offended with my comment.  It was
meant as a joke.

In defense I suggest you try living in the same house as a shrink.


<<<<


Tornadoes v earthquakes.

> It's great that this reality-check question has registered with
> some members
> of this listserv, even if it is incorrectly attributed.  The
> tornadoes last
> week in Arkansas killed about as many people as Northridge or
> Loma Prieta, yet
> likely will be forgotten a year from now, whereas Northridge and
> Loma Prieta
> have influenced, and will continue to influence, codes for years
> to come, and
> jack up construction and design costs in the process.

Perhaps the question should be, "Where is the money?"  The high cost of
earthquakes is one of the main motivations for the research (esp.
performance based design).  This research and code development becomes more
appropriate as taxpayers pick up a greater share of the tab.

The more fiscal responsibility that the Feds pick up, the greater will be
the regulation and control.  If you want a good example, just look at the
pending tobacco legislation brought about by state Medicare lawsuits.



Which summed up an excellent line of discussion.

Why are the Insurance Co and disaester relief people interested in
earthquakes ::


The Newcastle Earthquake hit a town of 500,000 with a 5.5 Mag event.  It is
at that level that 
the USGS really get serious at Menlo Park with their bulletins.  It only
killed thirteen interesting enough most of those in an engineered building,
but it was one of the largest claims on Insurance funds for the repair of
masonry mostly in the last three decades.  Newcastle has very few masonry
structures over 2 storeys.

If you look at the Menlo Park data for about the last nine months
Earthquake Magnitude	Qed Bulletin	Quake List	Estimated Number of events

4.7 or less	2407		
4.8	145		145
4.9	121	1	121
5	127		127
5.1	97	1	97
5.2	70		70
5.3	59	5	59
5.4	36	3	36
5.5	36	18	36
5.6	19	10	19
5.7	15	21	21
5.8	15	12	12
5.9	6	12	12
6	0	4	4
6.1	3	4	4
6.2	1	3	3
6.3	2	2	2
6.4	6	4	4
6.5	1	8	8
6.6	1	3	4
6.7	1	3	3
6.8		2	2
6.9	1	1	1
7		1	1
7.1			
7.2			
7.3			
7.4			
7.5			
7.6			
7.7		1	1
7.8			
7.9		1	1
8			
8.1			
8.2			
8.3			
8.4			
8.5			
Total	3169	120	793

One can get a feel for the number of world events.

It is not the Loma Prieta or the Northbridges that are the real problem it
is the Nahanni earthquake and its equivalent that hits the Eastern North
America.  Because in these areas the urban masonry has not been tested with
"real earthquake loads" in the last sixty to 100 years during teh big
building period, the way the Califnianian  and Japanese areas are tested.

Try one of those big ones on the New Madrid fault line and St Louis or
Memphis will probabely resemble a junk yard.  And the death count will
probably be horrific, if Spitak and Tashkent are anything to go by.  The
attentuation rate is also a significant problem, so it will be felt
everywhere.  i believe the Insurance Co's call it Aremgeddon ie they are all
broke!

This is why the work of Ms P Gross at PU and D Abrams at Urbana is pretty
important and I urge anyone who has been through an earthquake recovery to
help Ms Gross with her questionairre.

Finally I would end with an series of  engineering quotes that I will
attribute::

C F Richter 
It is geologically obvious that the earthquakes of two or three centuries do
not provide an adequate basis for estimating the seismicity of a region. 

C F Richter 
There is little to justify the common tacit assumption that the strongest
shaking known to have affected a given point in the past will not be
exceeded there.

Anonymous Japanese Source 
The fact that civil agencies issuing permits may approve a design does not
necessarily mean that earthquakes will do so.

Station Agent, Cisco, Placer Co California (1912 August 30) 
Had a hell of an earthquake.


And finally to say this is a good healthy list server that is different to
the duelling expert type of engineering that dominates some of teh projects
I have worked on.


So thanks for the week that was.

John Nichols