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RE: purposely permeable concrete

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Another reason is probably related to the glue used in adhering the VAT.
>From what I understand, environmental protection laws prohibit the use
of the glue used many years ago.  People within the industry have told
me the "newer, safer" glue will not perform when even small amounts of
water are introduced.  I've seen problems with floors both with and
without vapor barriers using this new glue.
Thanks,
Bob Germaine
email: bgermain(--nospam--at)ch2m.com
phone: 541-758-0235 ext 3440
fax: 541-752-0276

> ----------
> From: 	Canitz, Charles F
> NAB02[SMTP:Charles.F.Canitz(--nospam--at)nab02.usace.army.mil]
> Sent: 	Tuesday, June 09, 1998 5:34 AM
> To: 	'seaoc(--nospam--at)seaoc.org'
> Subject: 	RE: purposely permeable concrete
> 
> Russ -
>   I've also encountered this problem. A few years past, I was the PM
> for the
> upgrade of an existing 30 year old building. Part of the upgrade
> included
> replacement of a VAT flooring located in the lobby with rubber
> flooring.
> After in-place for a few months, several of rubber tiles lost their
> bond to
> the 5" concrete slab on grade. When a tile was removed, moisture was
> evident. Prior to placement of the new flooring, water vapor
> transmission
> tests occurred per the flooring manufacturer's requirements. However,
> said
> tests occurred after all of the existing VAT was removed(lessons
> learned).
> The new rubber flooring apparently acted as a watertight membrane
> while the
> VAT was a lot more permeable and didn't trap the water vapor. It was
> also
> subsequently discovered that no vapor barrier occurred below the slab.
> 
> Charlie Canitz 
> 
> > ----------
> > From: 	rnester(--nospam--at)juno.com[SMTP:rnester(--nospam--at)juno.com]
> > Reply To: 	seaoc(--nospam--at)seaoc.org
> > Sent: 	Tuesday, June 09, 1998 12:23 AM
> > To: 	seaoc(--nospam--at)seaoc.org
> > Subject: 	purposely permeable concrete
> > 
> > Permeable concrete sounds like a guarenteed failure for the
> flooring. 
> > The planned sheet vinyl flooring will then become the vapor barrier,
> even
> > if the concrete is of normal porosity.  In dozens of buildings built
> in
> > the 1960's and 70's, I have seen two interesting rphenomena.  The
> first
> > is that the water pressure will eventually lift the flooring off,
> glue
> > and all.  The second is that the concrete underneath will be dark,
> > indicating water saturation.  In the most extreme case, with a more
> > modern urethane floor, blisters formed on the flooring, and if
> punctured
> > would actually squirt water.   Similarly, plywood or OSB placed on a
> slab
> > w/o a proper vapor barrier will swell and raise up, eventually
> requiring
> > total replacement. If the flooring is to last, there must be an
> effective
> >  vapor barrier under the slab.  
> > 
> > Russ Nester
> > rnester(--nospam--at)juno.com
> > 
> >
> _____________________________________________________________________
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> > 
> > 
> 
> 
>