Need a book? Engineering books recommendations...

Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

RE: FASTENERS: Plymetal Teks

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
In this case, unless your aspect ratio is pushing 3:1 or 4:1 I would not
think that diaphragm shear is high enough to worry about. In this case,
Plymetal Teks should fit the job just fine since their are not the weak link
in the failure mode. This is especially true if your contractor is using OSB
rather than 5-Ply T&G panels.
What do you think?
Dennis

-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Allen, S.E. [mailto:Bill(--nospam--at)AllenDesigns.com]
Sent: Wednesday, July 29, 1998 8:43 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: FASTENERS: Plymetal Teks


My application is a roof diaphragm, not shear walls.

-----Original Message-----
From: Dennis Wish [mailto:wish(--nospam--at)cwia.com]
Sent: Wednesday, July 29, 1998 12:00 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: FASTENERS: Plymetal Teks


Bill, I had one other thought after send you the info that you needed. The
problem with connections is that the failure mode generally occurs in
buckeling of the stud member. The next level of failure is shearing failure
in the screw to the stud. In the second type, the work published in the '97
code reduced the thickness of studes for lateral strength from 16 gauge as
suggested by APA to 20 Gauge based upon cyclic testing done under the
guidelines of the SEAOSC testing standards. In the later case, the
performance improved by the greater ductility of the studs.
The point I am trying to make is that since the failure is not generally due
to the screw or tearout from the sheathing but in the buckeling of the
bearing material, it probably is no use to try and design from the strength
of the screw or panel alone. The code values are emperical, based upon
testing rather than numerically supported analysis.
You might check with AISI to see if they have accomplished any additional
testing with with the type of structure you are designing.
>From what you explained, it sounds like you are designing something like a
Butler type building but using a plywood shear system. Have you thought
about the Hardy Frames - embedding a Hardy frame where you need it for shear
and leaving the 48" spaced studs for gravity load's only?
Let me know if you need any info on Hardy Frame. They are located in Ventura
under the listing of Hardy Industries.

Dennis

-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Allen, S.E. [mailto:Bill(--nospam--at)AllenDesigns.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 1998 2:06 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: FASTENERS: Plymetal Teks


I am designing a structure such that I cannot find any "Code" values for a
fastener. I am designing a one story structure with 3/4" plywood roof
sheathing and light gauge (16 and 18) purlins at 4'-0". I need a fastener
with a fluted head that has some kind of shear value attaching 3/4" plywood
to 16 or 18 gauge metal. The shear wall tables in the 1997 UBC do not work
since one of the requirements are that the "studs" have to be at 24" or
less. I have already contacted ITW Buildex, Compass International, Grabber
International (via Angeles Metal Systems) and no one seems to have data that
I can use. If anyone out there has any specification with "Code" loads, I
would be most appreciative.

Thanks,
Bill Allen