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Re: RE:basement uplift follies

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Thanks for the replies, I got some private responses as well, everything
from floating logs to chipped rubber tires in the water. I am sure the EPA
would not like the anti freeze idea.  As it turns out the contractor is not
opposed to renting large water tanks.

Part of the problem is that the geotech has not committed to the amount of
water that could occur. All back drains have to be pumped. The pumps need to
be sized. (not by me!) We have a complete waterproof membrane sandwiched
between two layers of lean concrete, under a 18" mat footing with gravel,
vapor barrier and finish slab over that. We have a "back up" drain pipe
system under the finish slab. We have a waterproofing consultant). We will
not have a drainage system through the first winter. Once the building is in
place, we have enough weigh to resist uplift even if the pumps fail.

Jeff Smith

-----Original Message-----
From: Michael Davis <michael.davis(--nospam--at)ferc.fed.us>
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Date: Thursday, July 30, 1998 7:18 AM
Subject: RE:basement uplift follies


>
>Do you have any plans for a drainage system underneath the slab or
>behind the walls?  A properly designed and installed drainage system
>can effectively eliminate the uplift forces.  Another option is to drill
>shallow wells (30 to 40 feet) and install pumps in the ground outside of
>the building.  I have seen this done for hydropower plants in Nebraska
>that effectively reduce the phreatic level below the foundation of the
>plant.  Of course, you will need to get power to the site to do this and
>have someone regularly check the pumps and the phreatic level in the
>wells.  Either way, this would eliminate the need to counter act the uplift
>force.  The slab could heave if the water below the slab is not drained
>away and it freezes, no matter how heavy the counterweight is.
>
>I hope this helps.  Good luck.
>
>Michael S. Davis, P.E.
>
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