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RE: Signing Plans

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Good advice Ernie, but unfortunately an engineer must sign his work. If it
happens to be a framing plan that shows architectural features, you can do
nothing more than indicate that the background was provided to you and, if
it's not an existing or remodel, that you worked from what the designer
provided. If the owner hired the designer, he becomes responsible for what
the design provides to me.
On the other hand, if I redraw the architectural and make a mistake - I'm
open to suit.

My choices - stamp "For Structural Only", limit your liability on your
contract and don't give the owner an opportunity to hire a lawyer on
contingency - don't carry liability insurance.  I know this is  a greatly
debated issue, but it works for me. Lawyers, unless paid by the client, will
not take a contingency case when there is nothing to collect. Courts
generally do not take personal assets like homes and cars unless there is
negligence in the matter.

I'd still rather put For Structural Only on the plans than have the judge
think I intended to stamp and approve the architectural. At least there is
an argument for intentions.

Dennis

-----Original Message-----
From:	ErnieNSE(--nospam--at)aol.com [mailto:ErnieNSE(--nospam--at)aol.com]
Sent:	Thursday, July 30, 1998 9:36 PM
To:	seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject:	Re: Signing Plans

Dennis,

Be carefull when you sign non-structural plans.

I heard from another engineer his experience with signing architectural
sheets
on the job he did the structural engineering on. He consulted with his
lawyer
about writing "structural only" beside his stamp on the architectural
sheets,
and the laywer said that in court, in front of the judge, the "structural
only" note does not mean a thing. When you sign a sheet, you are responsible
for it. If something goes wrong later on and they are looking for somebody
to
sue, they'll go after you and not the unlicensed designer.

Whether it is true or not, I don't know.

Ernie Natividad