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RE: Lag screws in withdrawal from end grain

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Bill,

I think there is a distinction in most code language between "shall not"
and "should not".  "Shall not" means absolutely not while "should not"
usually has exceptions associated with it (i.e.  "when this condition
cannot be avoided ...").  I think you'll find "should" or "should not"
used very seldom in the code as compared to "shall not" or "shall."

Ed Marshall, P.E.

> -----Original Message-----
> From:	Bill Allen, S.E. [SMTP:bill(--nospam--at)allendesigns.com]
> Sent:	Tuesday, September 08, 1998 5:10 PM
> To:	seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject:	RE: Lag screws in withdrawal from end gr
> 
> I guess building codes need to be more directive by using the phrases
> "shall" and "shall not" since we engineers are incapable of properly
> interpreting the intent of the phrase "should not".
> 
> Regards,
> Bill Allen
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: ErnieNSE(--nospam--at)aol.com [mailto:ErnieNSE(--nospam--at)aol.com]
> Sent: Tuesday, September 08, 1998 11:58 AM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: Re: Lag screws in withdrawal from end gr
> 
> 
> Roger,
> 
> I still want to know why they used the word "should not".
> 
> <snip>
> 
> 
>