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RE: Re[2]: DRAFMAN RATES

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Everything you said is true - no argument. However, there is more - I can
produce a set of CAD drawings that are virtually indistiguishable from hand
delineated methods. The tip-off is the perfection - manual drafting is
imperfect, but any artform can be copied electronically.

Years ago I found a handlettering font that mystified my clients and
building officials who were sure the drawings were done by hand. This soon
became common place and the "magic" was  gone.

I learned how to use line weights, "hatch" patterns to add depth -
perspective - to the drawings. Today, my packages retain more of the artform
than was possible when I worked by hand. This is simply due to the fact that
I can produce better looking work than I have the ability to do manually.

I worked for Hughes Helicopters - which in no way qualifies me as an expert
on drafting presentation. However, we had a semi-retired architect, Walt
LeLand AIA, who was a Church Architect from Chicago. His hand lettering
style was very reminesent of the older Gothic arts. His script had the flair
of a great Church designer. Walt's drawings were the last and only time I
ever witnessed the style being created. I suppose Walt's style went by way
of the Dinosaurs because it was too labor intensive. Not only did the 70's
bring recession, but it brought a new consciousness about productivity. The
extinction of an architectural style was problably one of the first victims
of "downsizing" to hit our industry.

I was trained in architecture as well as engineering and believed that
architects have a greater concern for presentation. My engineering side was
more concerned with practicality and percision - not aesthetics. I've always
taken great pride in the presentation of my work and believe that many of my
clients were drawn to this. It was not a matter of how pretty it looked, but
how well laid out the package was and the ease in which information could be
located. Equally important was how easy it was to read - even computer
generated hand lettering fonts can be difficult to read when numbers are
used. Therefore, great strains were made to find the right lettering size
for the font used (5/54" is now my standard for a san serif style and 3/32"
for a hand lettering font).

The problem is not the tools, but the personal skills or lack there-of. The
redeming factor is that if we can discuss this topic, there are still those
engineers who have not forgotten the "art" of engineering. This won't die
because of computers - they'll be reborn.

Dennis S. Wish PE


-----Original Message-----
From: jerome.tan(--nospam--at)PAREURO.COM [mailto:jerome.tan(--nospam--at)PAREURO.COM]
Sent: Sunday, November 01, 1998 6:08 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org; wish(--nospam--at)cwia.com
Subject: Re[2]: DRAFMAN RATES


I am not an old-timer and could say that I am a child of the new computer
technology age. But on a personal preference, I like the manually drafted
drawings. 2-D drawings could be shown with "depth" by shading the sheets
with colors.

But CAD Softwares ability to be reused and/ modified in multiple projects is
its strongest advantage. It really does look very plane in 2-D  but this is
a minor if not negligible factor. In the end, it is the readability and
constructibility of the drawing that does matter rather than its aesthetic
presentation.


______________________________ Reply Separator
_________________________________
Subject: RE: DRAFMAN RATES
Author:  MIME:wish(--nospam--at)cwia.com at INTERNET
Date:    11/01/98 2:00 AM


I'm not sure why Bob abhors cad software? I understand the importance of a
structural draftsperson and would not hire a drafter simply because he can
use a CAD program. Without the ability to understand what he/she is looking
at or the materials used, no type of drafting (manual or CAD) is adequate.
The advantage of CAD to manual drafting techniques is it's ability for
precision. In my days of manual methods it was not uncommon to find a
production draftsperson who "fudged" the detailing rather than identify when
dimensional differences of a fraction of an inch mattered.
The point is that CAD is a tool - no better or worse than manual methods in
philosophy. CAD shines when repetitive steps or construction using
pre-defined blocks can be used. I've worked both ways - but have not owned a
drafting table in over twelve years.

Regards
Dennis

-----Original Message-----
From: Bobeng(--nospam--at)aol.com [mailto:Bobeng(--nospam--at)aol.com] Sent: Tuesday, October 27, 1998
7:19 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: DRAFMAN RATES



Bill Allen -

I , as an old timer , enjoyed your BRIEF response to Josie !

When I started my full time private practice in May of '64 my very first
employee was a Structural Draftsman [ now being known as a ' Drafter ' ] .
After I hired my two Structural Engineers, shortly thereafter , as I
suspected
, the employee that 'Made' more profit for my small firm was the draftsman.
He had , by then , had  15 years of experience.  {{ His artistic and
professional work is still recognizable in  this small South Bay area }} !

Did he have BRAINS ?  You better believe it.  He knew that when the SE's
handed him Detail Drawings to draft [ after their labourious calcs ] whether
and/or not they were Good ! !     This is why , now that I am into the 90's,
that I abhor AUTO CAD , etc. , etc. , etc.  !!   ( NO Style )   { as well as
some of the Structural Software at which I have looked , in this short time
period } .

TEMPUS FUGIT CELERITER !

RLK       [ and, I did not spell the misnomer in the above
subject]


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