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RE: ringwall reinforcing design

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Thank you, all,

I model this problem with FEM using compression only springs for
soil. The resulted shear and torsion forces in the concrete ringwall 
section is small. It supports the conclusion by Rajendran that use 
minimum vertical reinfocement for shear and torsion. 
Aswin, you must mean Section 29 of "Structural engineering Handbook" 
instead of Chapter 27 for hoop stress reinforcing.  Thanks


Liao

> -----Original Message-----
> From:	P.Rajendran [SMTP:rajendra(--nospam--at)mmind.net]
> Sent:	Saturday, November 07, 1998 3:55 AM
> To:	seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject:	Re: ringwall reinforcing design
> 
> The ringwall foundation under the tank is buried for a good part of its
> depth.  Unless you are faced with the relatively less common situation
> of having to support the rimgwall on piers, traditional ringwall will be
> at least 30" deep and 12" wide.  If you assume some active pressure
> acting inside the wall causing ring tension in the wall, some
> reinforcement will br required.  Provide some nominal stirrups to keep
> the longitudinal bars in position.  That amount of reinforcement should
> be adequate, because shear and torsion is rarely a problem in ringwall
> continuously supported on soil.
>  
> Rajendran
>  
> > Yang, Liao/ANC wrote:
> > >
> > > I need design a concrete ringwall to support a flat bottom anchored
> water
> > > tank.
> > > The seismic overturn moment and base shear are calculated per AWWA
> D100.
> > >
> > > My question are:
> > > How do I size the ringwall reinforcing Torsion and Shear? Is there
> > > any reference book or standard procedure I can find? Is there any hand
> > > calculation
> > > instead of FEA?
> > >
> > > Thanks
> > >
> > > Liao
> > >
> 
>