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RE: Tilt Up Construction & Lock Wall?

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Title: RE: Tilt Up Construction & Lock Wall?

Dear Mystery Structeng1:

Your description was just fine, until you got to the roof structure.  Outside of California and Arizona, most tiltwall concrete buildings in the USA use steel deck roof diaphragms supported on open-web steel joists and joist-girders.  It should also be pointed out that two and three story tiltwall construction is becoming increasingly common.

Regards,

Stan R. Caldwell, P.E.
Dallas, Texas

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-----Original Message-----
From: Structeng1(--nospam--at)aol.com [mailto:Structeng1(--nospam--at)aol.com]
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 1998 9:26 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: Tilt Up Construction & Lock Wall?


In a message dated 11/18/98 5:35:31 PM Pacific Standard Time,
cstsaur(--nospam--at)ms1.hinet.net writes:

<< Can anybody tell me what is "Tilt Up Construction"?
 And what is a "Lock Wall"?-- appeared in a English book about surface repair
of concrete
 structures.
 
 Any info are welcomed.
 
 
 Regards
 
         Tsaur@Taiwan
  >>


In a nutshell, tilt-up construction is usually a type of construction where
first the slab-on-grade is poured and allowed to cure to a certain strength.
Then the concrete "tilt-up" walls are poured directly on the slab.  Once the
walls reach adequate strength the walls are then lifted or tilted by a crane
into place.  (Thus the term tilt-up.)  In addition to the tilt-up walls there
usually is a panelized roof system of girders, purlins and subpurlins (2X4 or
2X6 @ 24"oc) with a wood roof diaphragm.  These buildings are easy and cheap
to build and normally are used in industrial areas.

And I'm not sure what a "Lock Wall" is.

I hope this helps!




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