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Re: Rockery Retaining Walls

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Frankly, I'm more than a little annoyed about some of the responses on
this topic. The posts by Rod Schenk could be politely classified as less
than useful.

Charley Hamilton happens to work with me & we discussed the concept of a
"X man" rock.   We were not sure whether it was the size rock moveable
by X men or it weighed as much as X men.   After reading responses I
decided to look for the answer myself.  A quick search yielded:

http://www.ci.seattle.wa.us/dclu/cam/cam321.htm

Client Assistance Memo #321
Rockeries: Prescriptive design and installation standards
July 1998

<SNIP>
Rock Sizes:

For a rockery between four and six feet in height, the prescriptive
standard requires that the lower half be constructed of 4-man or larger
rocks (defined below). For the upper half, progressively smaller rocks
may be used, with a minimum size of 2-man for the uppermost course. The
plans shall include the rock sizes to be used in the installation.
Approximate rock sizes are as follows:

                             Approx. weight                     Approx.
volume

    1 man                58 - 210 pounds                 0.4 - 1.3 cubic
feet
    2 man              265 - 580 pounds                 1.6 - 3.6 cubic
feet
    3 man           760 - 1,830 pounds               4.7 - 11.2 cubic
feet
    4 man        3,000 - 4,000 pounds             18.4 - 24.5 cubic feet

    5 man                     5,000 pounds                       30.7
cubic feet
    6 man                     7,000 pounds                       42.9
cubic feet


Rock Placement:
The base course of rocks must be embedded into firm undisturbed earth to
a minimum depth of 12 inches to provide a secure footing for the
rockery. The long dimension of the rocks must extend into the slope
behind the rockery to provide maximum stability.  Subsequent courses of
rocks must be placed to lock into the rocks in the lower course or tier.

<SNIP>

I don't know much about rocks but I do know how to find answers & give
explanations.

regards

 Robert Kazanjy, PE  **Disclaimer: I speak for myself not UC-Irvine**
 Senior Development Engineer
 Civil & Environmental Engineering
 UC Irvine
 E4130 EG,  Zot: 2175
 rkazanjy(--nospam--at)uci.edu

 PS: Save bandwidth & snip SEAOC trailers in reply!


Rod Schenk wrote:

> CASE AND POINT!
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Charley Hamilton [mailto:chamilto(--nospam--at)eng.uci.edu]
> > Sent: Wednesday, January 13, 1999 2:06 PM
> > To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> > Subject: Re: Rockery Retaining Walls
> >
> >
> > Actually, I was assuming it was a standardized term & I should
> > therefore find
> > out what *exactly* it meant.  I *assumed* it had something to do
> > with either
> > the mass (Mrock = 2 or 3 times Mman) or the number of guys needed
> > to move it.
> > However, I figured it was something like a horsepower which has been
>
> > standardized and has a fixed relationship to other, more well-known,
> unit
> > systems.
> >
> > I'd still appreciate a definition if anyone out there knows one,
> > or at least
> > info as to whether the term is a standard one (not as in ASTM
> > ###-###) but one
> > used commonly in the industry.  Rod didn't include his "figured
> > out" meaning,
> > so I'm still at a loss as to what "everyone else" means by the term.
>
> >
> >       Charley
> >
> > ---------
> > Charles Hamilton, EIT                         Phone:
> > 949.824.8257 (office)
> > Graduate Student                                      949.856.2797
> (home)
> > Department of Civil and                       FAX:    949.824.8694
> > Environmental Engineering                     Email:
> chamilto(--nospam--at)eng.uci.edu
> > University of California, Irvine
> >
> > > From: "Rod Schenk" <rs(--nospam--at)pacificdesignbuild.com>
> > > Subject: RE: RE: Rockery Retaining Walls
> > > Date: Wed, 13 Jan 1999 12:15:46 -0800
> > > [snip]
> > > Well Engineers, its sounds like some of you are spending too
> > much time in
> > > the text books and not enough time out in the field.  I live in
> > the Great
> > > North West and I admit that coming originally from back East
> > that the term
> > > "One Man Rock" or "Two Man Rock" was new to me. But being as smart
> as we
> > > engineers think we are it took about 2 seconds to understand
> > what the term
> > > meant.
> >