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Re: Dinner Meeting Attendence

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The pre dinner meeting "Practical Design & Detailing Seminars" were
originally created to provide the attendees with practical and useful
information and tools and to attract more attendees for the dinner meetings.
Mr. Laines suggestion is a good one and was used originally when the seminar
series was created.  Each seminar had three different subjects presented at
30 minutes each , including questions.
The presentations at the dinner meetings should be of an interesting and
entertaining nature but not try to be a mini seminar.  Programs updating the
attendees on local, statewide, national and international issues that have
an effect the practice of structural engineering could generate a good
showing.  An other area that in the past has always drawn larger audiences
are program on disasters and/or collapses of structures.
The dinner meetings have always been a place to mix and mingle with peers.
I suggest keeping the programs informative and entertaining but do not try
to create a seminar atmosphere.
Rawn
-----Original Message-----
From: CLaines(--nospam--at)aol.com <CLaines(--nospam--at)aol.com>
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Date: Tuesday, February 02, 1999 1:59 PM
Subject: Re: Dinner Meeting Attendence


>Shafat,
>Suggestions for presentations that would encourage more attendance:
> Circulate a list of technical topics that are encountered in a typical
design
>office including an "others" item (check-off lists help stimulate thought
and
>are easier to respond to) at the SEAOSC meetings and on-line. These would
be
>items that the respondents have had trouble with, or that there is a
curiosity
>as to how other offices handle them. Then take the top 10 most popular
items,
>and ask for volunteers to share their solutions. For podium-shy engineers
and
>shorter solutions, panels would be one presentation method where several
>volunteers would share the stage.
> Ask around to plan checkers for volunteers to share gripes, horror
stories,
>humorous stories, words of advice, etc. Again, panel groups may help the
non-
>ToastMaster types.
> Charles Laines, Long Beach
>
>