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Re: Dynamic Loading

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> From: Dennis <dhcamilleri(--nospam--at)waldonet.net.mt>
> To: Dennis <dhcamilleri(--nospam--at)waldonet.net.mt>
> Subject: Re: Dynamic Loading
> Date: 3 June 1999 10:08p
> 
> It is true that course content depends on whether region is in a seimic
> zone or not. However noting from correspondence on flag pole deflection,
> where limits as wide ranging as L/7 up to L/200 were quoted, it appears
> that engineers nowadays are too codified. It is important that learning
is
> based on basics, not losing the woods for the trees, in order that
> principles may be understood. A previous posting on the flag pole
> deflection, mentioned that vortex shedding has to be taken into account.
> This did not even solicite a response, driving the point home that
building
> courses are to be more dynamic in their content.  
> 
> ----------
> > From: Dennis <dhcamilleri(--nospam--at)waldonet.net.mt>
> > To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> > Subject: Dynamic Loading
> > Date: 31 May 1999 7:51p
> > 
> >
>
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> > Your following message has been delivered to the list
> >   seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org at 11:03:49 on 31 May 1999.
> >
>
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> > 
> > 
> >                          The training of Civil/Structural Engineers is
> > limited to too static loading conditions.
> >                          What happens when an engineer is faced with
> > explosion damage or earthquake
> >                          related problems? Even the design of a simple
> > lamp-post involves the dynamic effect
> >                          of wind induced vibrations that engineers in
> their
> > normal design work are not
> >                          accustomed to.
> > 
> >                          Is it not time that building engineering
courses
> > become more dynamic in their course
> >                          content? The outputs obtained from computer
> > programmes must be fullyunderstood
> >                          by the design engineer, if we are to design
with
> > economy and elegance. 
> > 
> >                          A good start for a Structural Engineer to
> commence
> > in structural dynamics is by
> >                          referring to Professor Arthur Bolton's papers
in
> > the journal of the Structural Engineer
> >                          dated, 6/6/69, 9/78 vol56A, 8/8/83, & 1/3/94.
If
> > anyone has a copy of the 1969
> >                          paper, I would appreciate a fax copy-(fax No.
> > 00-356-233376). These papers
> >                          werethen incoporated into a book titled
> > "Structural Dynamics in Practice" - Macgraw
> >                          Hill. 
> > 
> >                          The methods outlined are conversant with
> > structural engineers as the same
> >                          methodolgy of structural analysis is adopted.
> > Being a past slide-rule engineer these
> >                          methods suit me fine and form part of my
routine
> > design work.
> > 
> >                          A recent addition of the Thomas Telford group
is
> > an ICE design & practice guide
> >                          "Dynamics-an introduction for civil and
> structural
> > engineers". This guide gives a simple
> >                          overview of when structural dynamics becomes
> > relevant to a project, with the
> >                          methods of design to be followed outlined.
> > 
> >                          The section of blast loading in above guide is
> > stated as being rather limited, whilst
> >                          rock blasting is hardly touched upon. Here
again
> I
> > refer to an excellent paper in the
> >                          Structural Engineer "Damage from
Explosions-real
> > or imaginary" by JD McCaughey,-
> >                          followed by the Structural Engineer
> Institution's
> > guide "The Structural Engineer's
> >                          response to explosion damage" & "Blast effects
> on
> > Buildings", edited by Mays and
> >                          Smith.
> > 
> >                          The pressures exerted by wave action on
> shore-line
> > structures are not well
> >                          documented. Perhaps a practice guide is needed
> in
> > this field.
> > 
> >                          A practical guide exists for the vibration of
> > floor slabs by the Steel Construction
> >                          Institute 1989. Is this guide only applicable
> for
> > steel/concrete structures, may it be
> >                          utilized for masonry/ timber slabs?
> > 
> > 
> > 
> >