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RE: Books in Australia

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Thanks!

> ----------
> From: 	KH H[SMTP:hongkik(--nospam--at)hotmail.com]
> Reply To: 	seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Sent: 	Wednesday, June 23, 1999 8:42 PM
> To: 	seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: 	Re: Books in Australia
> 
> Books in Australia are not that cheap. It cost about Aus$45 to Aus$80 for 
> locally authored books.
> 
> Some of the titles are:
> 1 Reinf. & Prestressed Concrete Design Book by Rangan & Faukles - $80
> 2.Steel Designer's handbook by Gorenc - $45
> 3. Prestressed Concrete Design by Gilbert
> 4. Structural Steel - Design & Behaviour
> 5. Books produced by Aust. Concrete Insitute & Aust. Insitute of Steel 
> Construction.
> 
> The books are written to Australian Codes which are closely similar to 
> American and some British.
> 
> Hope this list will help U.
> 
> Hong K.
> 
> >From: Francis.Ang(--nospam--at)toyota.com.ph
> >Reply-To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> >To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> >Subject: Books in Australia
> >Date: Wed, 23 Jun 1999 08:07:49 +0800
> >
> >Hi,
> >	Anybody out there who have suggestions on which engineering books to
> >buy in Australia?
> >	A friend of mine would be going to Sydney and I think it's an
> >oppurtunity for me to acquire some books.
> >	Could someone out there be so kind to give me some list or
> >suggestions for the books plus the authors of course.?
> >	Are engineering books cheap there? Are engineering books good in
> >that continent?
> >	I'm interested in Seismic Engineering, Dynamic Analysis, Steel,
> >Prestressed and Concrete Design.
> >	What are your suggestions?
> >	Thanks
> >
> >	A. Yango
> >	CE/SE
> >	TMP
> > > ----------
> > > From: 	Mark Gilligan[SMTP:MarkKGilligan(--nospam--at)compuserve.com]
> > > Reply To: 	seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> > > Sent: 	Tuesday, June 22, 1999 3:19 PM
> > > To: 	INTERNET:seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> > > Subject: 	Re: Seismic - Isolating CMU infill wall
> > >
> > > Alfonso
> > >
> > > In response to your questions.
> > >
> > > <       1.      If you provide a gap which is a little bit more than
> the
> > > anticipated deflection of the frame do you think the frame will still 
> >lean
> > > on
> > > the wall?>
> > >
> > > The actual seismic deflections will be much larger than calculated
> using
> > > the forces specified in the code.  As a result it may be difficult to
> > > acomplish what you intend.
> > >
> > > <       2.      Assuming that the frame will lean on the wall but the 
> >wall
> > >
> > > was not designed to resist the shear or lateral load, what will happen
> 
> >to
> > > the
> > > wall?>
> > >
> > > The problem is not with the wall but with the damage that the wall
> will
> > > cause to the frame.  In almost every eathquake where there are masonry
> > > infill walls in between concrete frames it is the frame that is
> damaged.
> > > <       3.      If the wall will fail, will the frame be able to
> resist
> > > the
> > >
> > > lateral load that has designed for in the first place?>
> > >
> > > Even if the wall fails it can induce torsional behavior in your 
> >structure
> > > which would significantly increase the demand on some members thus
> > > increasing the likelyhood that they will be damaged.  This happens 
> >because
> > > the infill walls are stiffer on one side of the building.
> > >
> > >
> > > Mark Gilligan
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
> 
> 
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