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Re: Sulfate bearing soil

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1. Coal Tar Epoxy at the time,
2. We were driving through a ash layer and, as usual, we cut off the tops at
the pile caps.  Coal Tar with good metal prep, good curing, and inspection
has very good adhesion.  I've used it, inorganic zincs and the like several
times in marine situations.
3. No.  It works in an immersion situation primarily.  The water table only
rarely at the site (evidently),
4. Steel was available, cost effective, and the contractor was setup for it
(this was an unusual site),
5. Nothing, nothing at all.

cmd

----- Original Message -----
From: Patrick F. Quinn <quinnair(--nospam--at)email.msn.com>
To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Sent: Saturday, July 03, 1999 5:46 PM
Subject: Re: Sulfate bearing soil


> 1.  What is the coating?
> 2.  How do you maintain the coating on the pile during driving?
> 3.  Would cathodic protection be appropriate?
> 4.  Why not use a different type (Cast   Reinforced Concrete) pile?
> 5.  What is the aversion to Type V?  It is the unstated standard here.
>
> Pat Quinn
> Henderson, Nevada
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Michael Donoghue <cmd(--nospam--at)ibm.net>
> To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
> Sent: Thursday, July 01, 1999 7:15 PM
> Subject: Re: Sulfate bearing soil
>
>
> > Mr. Cohen,
> >
> > I would assume the chemistry is due to leachate from the debris you
> > mentioned.  Removing local soils would seem to be at best a temporary
fix.
> > How do you see it?
> >
> > I had a similar problem driving H-pile through an ash dump at a site
> > Missouri a few years back.  The best thing we could come up with is
> coating
> > the piles.
> >
> > cmd
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: JCohen <jccpc(--nospam--at)email.msn.com>
> > To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
> > Sent: Thursday, July 01, 1999 1:42 PM
> > Subject: Sulfate bearing soil
> >
> >
> > > I recently had a soils test done for a propsective residence. The
> sulfate
> > > content came out at between .15 and .20 % by weight of soil, excpet
for
> 1
> > of
> > > 9 samples which tested at 3.7%. I have asked the testing laboratory to
> > > confirm their results, as this was also sampled within 3 feet above
and
> > > below other samples which tested at between the .15 and .20 %. The pH
> was
> > > also down on this single sample to 3.5, whereas the other samples were
> > > around 5.1 to 6.5. My question is: would it be enough to remove high
> > sulfate
> > > content  locally from around the foundation without resorting to Type
V
> > > cement with added pozzolans? Are there other methods to avoid sulfate
or
> > > acid attack? If the test results are correct, and I hav enot reason to
> > > believe they are wrong, it also appears that the sulfate is not
> migrating.
> > >
> > > For information, there was a significant amount of debris found in the
> > trial
> > > pits at 8 to 12 feet below the surface. The site was a former horse
> track
> > > with a pond, which was filled in. The locations of the track and pond
> are
> > > not known, but are likely to be in the vicinity of the pits. Safe
> bearing
> > > capacity has been estimated at 4500 psf.
> > >
> > > Thanks for any suggestions.
> > >
> > > James Cohen
> > > James Cohen Consulting, P.C.
> > > Website: http://expertpages.com/~jccpc
> > >
> > >
> > >
>
>
>
>
>
>