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Re: Retaining wall compensation

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Paul,
I tend not to get greedy considering that I am desiging only a one foot strip 
out the total quarter mile. My fees for property walls is generally around 
$400.00 since the only thing required by the contractor is a copy of the 
retainpro drawing with some embellishments for drainage if needed.
I did one project where I used the retaining wall program (Retainpro) to 
model four or five different sections so as to find out why an existing wall, 
when built to the plans would have failed. I charged over $3,000.00 for this 
one since I spent many more hours and had to write up a formal report. BTW, 
the reason for the failure appears to be the location of the stem steel. My 
report indicated that I suspected the contractor moved the steel to the front 
of the wall rather than at the backside. When they demo'd the damaged wall 
they found the steel at the front of the stem. 
RetainPro turned out to be a great forensic's tool. 
If I am required to provide full working drawings with specification and more 
than the typical ebellished cross sections then I would charge at my regular 
houly rate.

I guess it depends upon how much is expected of me during the course of the 
project. I have been asked to design long wall around industrial parkes and 
have bid around $1,500 for the design even though the wall was only one or 
two typical sections and no real retaining. I lost this job to a lower bidder 
in my area.

Dennis


In a message dated 7/20/99 5:54:14 PM Pacific Daylight Time, 
pfeather(--nospam--at)san.rr.com writes:

<< I am curious how others throughout the country charge for retaining wall 
design.
 
 Most of the retaining wall work I have been involved in has been project 
specific as either part of a building structure or structural foundation 
system.
 The project fee is typically determined for the project as a whole via the 
usual methods; estimated time and effort, percentage of project cost, tarot 
cards, the magic eight ball... :-)
 
 What I am curious about is when the amount of design and drafting time is 
minor, two or three different conditions maybe, yet the walls are long and 
numerous with a quantifiably higher level of exposure.
 
 To create an example, say a wall 12' high and 1/4 mile long, and regular 
enough that only one wall section will cover the whole thing. How do you 
charge for the increased exposure over a design for the same wall only 50 ft 
long?
 
 Paul Feather >>