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RE: UCI-CoLA Research

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An important (but often overlooked) consideration for engineers that
evaluate earthquake damage is the correlation between visual damage and loss
of capacity or stiffness.  I would be interested to documentation of
observed visual/cosmetic damage (cracking, nail pops, wrinkling of joint
tape, etc) with increasing deformation (drift).  This, coupled with
hysteresis loops showing changes in capacity or stiffness as a function of
drift or number of cycles, would be very useful to somebody trying to
determine if a cracked wall has been measurably affected.  Extending this
data for walls with openings would be fantastic.

Brian 

-----Original Message-----
From: Amie Smith [mailto:asmith(--nospam--at)eng.uci.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, September 08, 1999 3:30 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: UCI-CoLA Research


This message is being sent to act as a recruitment devise for
suggestions
from the design profession on timber shear walls.  Since late '98 UC
Irvine
has been conducting a Light-framed Shearwall Research Project in
conjunction
with the City of LA.  This project has revolved around the construction,

pseudo-static testing and analyzing of 27 different wall configurations
with
variable sheathing type and thickness', nail type and spacing as well as

wood and steel stud framing.  To date the project has provided raw and
summarized data related to envelope load-displacement curves, estimates
of
the yield limit and strength limit states, drift information, etc.
Currently, myself and 2 other graduate students involved in running this

research project, will ultimately use this collected data for the basis
of
our MS thesis.  As we begin the brainstorming for specific thesis topics
we
are interested in the ideas and advise of the design professional's.
Are
there any topics that specifically interest you or any ongoing issues in
the
design community that a thesis paper could address?  If you would like
more
information on the project e-mail me at asmith(--nospam--at)eng.uci.edu, otherwise we

look forward to hearing your responses/suggestions.

Thank You
Amie Smith
UCI Graduate Student