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RE: retaining snow loads

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100 ft of snow fall is real.  Remember, that consolidation and melt reduce
the ground snow load.  The roof sees the snow fall, which either melts or
slides off.  The structure mentioned had fractured wall members and was
closed for repair.

Bill Scott, P.E.
VECO Engineering
949 East 36th Street, Suite 500
Anchorage, AK 99508

Phone 907-762-1655
Fax 907-762-1733

> ----------
> From: 	Paul Meyer[SMTP:PMeyer(--nospam--at)HASimons.com]
> Reply To: 	seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Sent: 	Friday, September 17, 1999 8:50 AM
> To: 	'seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org'
> Subject: 	RE: retaining snow loads
> 
> And I thought 6 metres (20 feet) of snow in Rossland, BC was a lot! 
> Is this a typo or do you guys have rocket propelled snowplows? 
> 
> We had a failure of a ski area structure in Alaska due to lateral loading
> of 
> snow that slid off the roof.  Do not know if the design engineer wrote 
> anything about it. The structure is located at Alyeska Ski Resort, near 
> Anchorage.  Snow fall exceeds 100 feet per season. 
> 
> Seems prudent to consider lateral loads from roof fallen snow. 
> 
> Bill Scott, P.E. 
> VECO Engineering 
> 949 East 36th Street, Suite 500 
> Anchorage, AK 99508 
> 
>