Need a book? Engineering books recommendations...

Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

RE: Seismic load path

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
Use a tudor or reverse curb glulam three-hinged arches for the gravity
system and for stability in the transverse direction.

See the timber construction manual, 4th edition, for further info.

Gerard Madden, P.E.
Civil Engineer, Associate
CRJ Associates, Inc.
email: gerardm(--nospam--at)crjarch.com
tel: 650.324.0691
fax: 650.324.0927
web: www.crjarch.com


> -----Original Message-----
> From:	rlewis(--nospam--at)techteam.org [SMTP:rlewis(--nospam--at)techteam.org]
> Sent:	Friday, September 24, 1999 8:36 AM
> To:	seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject:	Seismic load path
> 
> Randy had such a good response to his second request for help with the
> treating of wood sills that it has motivated me to try again with my post.
> I
> sent this in last Friday but didn't get any response from the list.
> 
> I am doing the preliminary design of a church structure in CA.  Below is a
> rough sketch of the building cross section.  Use a mono-spaced font to
> view
> it, like courier.
> 
> 
>              /\
>            /    \
>          /        \
>         |          |
>         |          |
>        /|          |\
>      /  |          |  \
>    /    |----------|    \
>  /------|          |------\ 
> |                          |
> |                          |
> |                          |
> 
> 
> The roof slope is 5:12.  Part of the building has a mezzanine above a
> class
> room area, as shown in the center portion of the sketch.  The two side
> areas
> are to be mechanical equipment area.  Above the sanctuary there is NO
> mezzanine or mechanical space, it is open with cathedral type ceiling.
> The
> building foot print is 60' x 94' with the ridge running the long
> direction. 
> Ideally the architect wants to frame this out of wood.  Initially I
> thought
> of using wood I-joists for the rafters and clear spanning the sanctuary
> with
> glulams.
> 
> My question is one of lateral stability.  I assume I am not the first
> person
> to tackle a building shape like this.  I anticipate using shear walls for
> lateral resistance.  The architect has punched numerous window holes in
> the
> vertical side walls of the mezzanine.  How would you suggest framing this
> type of building for lateral stability, maintaining a load path through
> the
> upper and lower roofs, side walls, etc.  In the longitudinal direction
> (parallel to the ridge)I was thinking of using rigid steel frames in the
> core
> section for th high roof and mezzanine floor, and plywood shear walls at
> the
> out edge.  For the transverse direction I was thinking of using shear
> walls
> only.  I have a nice location in the middle of the building and at the end
> walls for shear walls.
> 
> Thanks for your input.  I appreciate all suggestions, even completely
> different framing schemes.
> 
> Rich
> 
> __________________________________________________
> 
> Richard Lewis, P.E.
> Missionary TECH Team
> rlewis(--nospam--at)techteam.org
> 
> The service mission like-minded Christian organizations
> may turn to for technical assistance and know-how.
>