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RE: Steel section properties Circa 1901

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Further to my last post I found the following information in Trautwine's
"The Civil Engineer's Pocket-Book" (1913).

Section index: B13 (Carnegie I-Beams) Note: The are to B13 (9") sections
listed: 35 lbs/ft. and 21 lbs/ft.

This information is for the 21 lb/ft section:
 
Height:	9 in.
Wt. per ft.:  21 lbs
Area:  6.31 sq. in.
Web:  0.290 in.
Flange Width: 4.330 in.
Ixx: 84.9 in^4
Iyy: 5.16 in^4
rx: 3.67 in.
ry:  0.90 in.
Sxx: 18.9 in^3
Cs (static): 201,300 lbs
Cm (moving): 157,300 lbs
M = C/8

Harry Olive, P.E.
Neill and Gunter
> -----Original Message-----
> From:	Olive, Harry [SMTP:HOlive(--nospam--at)ngl.ca]
> Sent:	Monday, November 01, 1999 9:08 AM
> To:	'seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org'
> Subject:	RE: Steel section properties Circa 1901
> 
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Your following message has been delivered to the list
>   seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org at 05:20:28 on 1 Nov 1999.
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> 
> AISC has a publication called "Iron and Steel Beams  1873 to 1952" which
> contains section properties for various shapes.  The publication also has
> the early unit stresses for various steel mills during the time period.
> There was a 9" American Standard Beam (adopted by American Steel
> Manufacturers on Jan 17, 1896) available around 1901; it was made by
> several
> manufacturers and the section properties varied slightly.
> 
> Harry Olive, P.E.
> Neill and Gunter  
> 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From:	Glenn Otto [SMTP:glenn.liberty.engineering(--nospam--at)worldnet.att.net]
> > Sent:	Friday, October 29, 1999 3:33 PM
> > To:	'seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org'
> > Subject:	Steel section properties Circa 1901
> > 
> > I have a building from 1901 with steel trusses.  The purlins are " 9 x
> > 21".  Does anyone have any historical information on the section
> > properties and material properties? The building is at the Norfolk Naval
> > Base in Virginia.  I believe this pre-dates AISC and maybe ASTM.  I
> guess
> > steel was already in production, so it isn't iron.  Thanks.
> > 
> > Also, I would like to nominate myself for one of the top 100 structural
> > engineers of the century. Really. Hey, I mean it.  Quit laughing.  I
> think
> > I'm pretty good. 
> > 
> > Glenn Otto, P.E.
> > LIBERTY ENGINEERING, P.C.
> > 
>