Need a book? Engineering books recommendations...

Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

Re: R value for log walls

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
R is intended to reflect inelastic properties of the system 
(including ductility, damping, redundancy, etc.) that result largely 
from the detailing of the elements and connections and global 
features of the system (layout, regularity, etc.).  R values are not 
really related to the "density" of the system.  If an R value is not 
provided in Tables 16-N or 16-O, some other rational procedure must 
be used (per Sections 1629.10 and 1632.5).  In the absence of 
conclusive support for an alternate system, it is reasonable to take 
R=1.

************
> From:          "Peter McCormack" <pmac(--nospam--at)realloghomes.com>
> To:            seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Date:          Wed, 8 Dec 1999 14:31:08 -0500
> Subject:       R value for log walls

> I am in the process of developing a MathCAD template for 
> determining seismic loads per UBC.
> 
> However, I need to determine a realistic "R" value to assign to log 
> walls acting as both shear and load bearing walls. Obviously, a wall 
> constructed of logs stacked 1 above the other has a higher density 
> than a light framed shear panel, but is not as dense as a concrete 
> or masonry log wall.
> 
> Does anyone have any suggestion, is there a calculation method to 
> determine it based on the material density???
> 
> Any help will be appreciated
> 
> Peter McCormack

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Michael Valley                                   E-mail: mtv(--nospam--at)skilling.com
Skilling Ward Magnusson Barkshire Inc.                  Tel:(206)292-1200
1301 Fifth Ave, #3200,  Seattle  WA 98101-2699          Fax:        -1201