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RE: Improving Construction Practices

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Rick,
You missed my point regarding construction practices. There seems to be a
different perspective on the issues depending on your practice. If you
design steel, concrete and masonry structures then you tend to deal more
with skilled labor and the issues of coordinating the design team is like
find tuning the system.
However, in smaller wood framed projects (custom homes to condo's) we tend
to deal more with unorganized, unskilled labor where the quality of
construction is the pressing issue. The obstacle here is the construction
lobby who resists greater education or knowledge in order to obtain
licensing.
Why don't we attempt a joint venture with NAHB, HUD, ASCE and SEA. Each
group is working along parallel lines to devise standards for residential
construction yet each group has no idea (except HUD and NAHB) as to what the
other proposes. What I would like to see is more communication between the
organizations rather than stricter codes.

Dennis

-----Original Message-----
From: Rick.Drake(--nospam--at)fluor.com [mailto:Rick.Drake(--nospam--at)fluor.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 18, 2000 8:35 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Improving Construction Practices




"A number of recent discussion threads have touched on the topic of
improving
construction practices per the seismic design codes we already have.  The
that
end, I thought I'd bring to everyone's attention a recent joint venture
activity
between the Applied Technology council (ATC) and SEAOC, funded by the
California
Seismic Safety Commission with Proposition 122 moneys.  The unique feature
of
this curriculum is that it is designed to educate both design professionals
and
those who enforce building codes.  Chris Rojahn (ATC) was the Project
Manager.
Several SEAOC members participated in this project, myself included.

In 1999, there were two training seminars given around California using the
materials, attended by 161 engineers, 34 architects, 57 building officials
and
inspectors.  I'm sure if there was enough interest expressed, ATC would be
interested in conducting more.  Even if you didn't attend the training
seminars,
the materials described below would be a valuable addition to your
bookshelf......."