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RE: Stone

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For dry lay retaining walls check out. 
	
http://www.bhglive.com/scgi/home_imp/home_imp.cgi?FNC=Proj__Alist_html___303
___2___5___103

	There was a thread a while back on the "rockery walls" and a link
was submitted by Robert Kazanjy
http://www.ci.seattle.wa.us/dclu/cam/cam321.htm
	Client Assistance Memo #321 Rockeries: Prescriptive design and
installation standards July 1998

For dry stack stone masonry walls the resources are limited:
	I would suggest doing a search at the National Park Service:
http://www.nps.gov/


Regards,
Harold Sprague

> -----Original Message-----
> From:	NRoselund(--nospam--at)aol.com [SMTP:NRoselund(--nospam--at)aol.com]
> Sent:	Thursday, January 27, 2000 10:31 AM
> To:	phil(--nospam--at)joistdesign.com
> Cc:	seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject:	Re: Stone
> 
> Phil,
> 
> Check out "Building With Stone" by Charles McRaven published 1980 by 
> Lippincott & Crowell, republished 1989 by Storey Communications, Inc., 
> Pownal, Vermont 05261.  It's a nontechnical, practical how-to book with 
> construction details and rationale for the author's recommendations.  It 
> includes a chapter on drystone work.
> 
> Do you know a source for information on structural design of a gravity 
> retaining wall using dry-stacked stone?  I have a project in an
> archeological 
> site for which an ordinary cantilever retaining wall would be too
> permanent 
> and disruptive.  A dry-stacked wall could protect and conceal the site,
> but 
> would be reversible some time in the future when archeologists of another 
> generation decide to see it for themselves.  Archeologists seem to have as
> 
> great a respect for the future as for the past.
> 
> Nels Roselund
> Structural Engineer