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Re: Off-subject(?): Indiana PE exam(s)

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In California, you need so many years of experience to become qualified to
take the PE exam.  A BS in engineering from an ABET program counts as four
years.  A BS in engineering from a nonABET program counts as 2 years. A MS
in engineering from an ABET program counts as 1 year.  As with most
guidelines, there are always an oppurtunities to appeal.  I have a MS in
engineering from a nonABET program (Caltech, home to Housner & other pillars
of earthquake engineering).  They denied my application for the PE.  I wrote
an appeal letter and got a waiver (with less than a week to the test).  One
of the SE's who I have worked with that I most admire does not have a BS.
He got his experience from, well, experience.

IMO, an excellect book for the seismic portion is 345 Solved Seismic Design
Problems by Majid Baradar, PE, Professional Publications, Inc.  ISBN
0-912045-78-7.

Mike O'Brien, PE


----- Original Message -----
From: Scott E Maxwell <smaxwell(--nospam--at)engin.umich.edu>
To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Sent: Thursday, February 24, 2000 11:07 AM
Subject: Re: Off-subject(?): Indiana PE exam(s)


> Jack,
>
> While can only speak about Michigan and Illinois (SE at least), I believe
> that most PE requirements are based on having a ABET accredited degree OR
> equivalent.  This means if you have an ABET accredited degree in
> engineering, you should have no problems.  However, if you have an
> engineering degree taht is not from an ABET accredited program (i.e.
> typically this would mean a degree from a foreign university), then it
> must be shown that the classes that you took are equivalent to what ABET
> requires.  This can mean that you have to "prove" this (i.e. gather
> descriptions of class for comparison to ABET classes).  The last scenario
> is if you don't have an engineering degree.  I honestly don't recall how
> Michigan (or Illinois) handle this since it wasn't something that I had to
> deal with myself.  If I remember tonight, I will peruse through my copy of
> the Michigan PE act and get back to you.  I think that you might have some
> problems in the future with reciprocity if you don't have your engineering
> degree.
>
> As an example, there was a post by someone try to get reciprocity in North
> Dakota (?).  This person had gotten his PE in Minnesota.  When took the PE
> exam in Minnesota, he was actually about a month short of 4 year
> experience but was allowed to take the exam.  He passed.  After practicing
> wiht his PE for many years, he applied for reciprocity in ND but was
> denied because at the time he took the PE exam he did not have the full 4
> years experience.  You can probably look through the archives if you want
> more info (or that person might speak up again).  I believe the post was
> around July or so.
>
> Therefore, you might want to look a little further into things before you
> take the PE.
>
> BTW, NSPE has some book that supposedly talks about the requirements for
> various states.  I might acquire that book in the future.  I think it
> costs about $90.
>
> hope this helps,
>
> Scott
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Scott E. Maxwell, SE, PE
> Structural Engineer
>
> SmithGroup Inc.
> 500 Griswold Street, Suite 200
> Detroit, MI  48226
>
> Telephone: (313) 442-8253                              Fax: (313) 983-3636
>
> Email for Business: smaxwell(--nospam--at)dt.smithgroup.com
> Email for Personal: smaxwell(--nospam--at)engin.umich.edu
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> On Thu, 24 Feb 2000 Jack_Creviston(--nospam--at)kawneer.com wrote:
>
> >
> > Thanks for the info, Scott.  I do not have a BS in engineering (yet).  I
> > do, however, have a BS in physics.  That, and the classes I've taken for
my
> > 2nd BS (engineering) allowed me to take the FE.  In Indiana, anyway, I
meet
> > the education requirements to take the PE.
> >
> > You do, however, bring up a good question about the requirements in
other
> > states.  I'm seriously considering not finishing my engineering degree
if I
> > pass the PE (I've been taking classes now for 13 years).  Will this
cause
> > problems with obtaining reciprocity other states? Do some states require
a
> > degree from an ABET program, period, no substitutions?
> >
> >
> >
>
>
>