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Stamping by SE vs. CE

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I have been trying to find in writing when a California Structural Engineer must seal drawings, versus when a California Civil Engineer may seal drawings.  My understanding is as follows;
 
California Hospitals & Schools MUST be sealed by a SE 
California Essential Service Facilities MAY be sealed by a CE or SE.
In Los Angeles County, buildings over 160 feet MUST be sealed by a SE.
Most everything else may be sealed by a CE or SE.
 
My question relates to a Essential Service Communications Tower, a separate stand-alone structure, designed by an Oregon vendor, sealed by their California CE. Wind controls the tower design.  Communications towers are designed to a special Code, which is more stringent than Title 24.  The main Essential Service Building at the site is sealed by a California SE.
 
Any comments? 
 
Steve Uthoff, S.E.
 
 
PS.  I have done a little research at http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/calaw.html.  This lists the 29 Codes that form California Law (along with the State Constitution and Statutes)
 
The Health and Safety Code, Division 12.5 Buildings used by the Public, Chapter 2 Essential Services Buildings, Section 16015 allows a CE or SE to seal Essential Services Buildings.
The Health and Safety Code, Division 107 Statewide Health Planning and Development, Part 7 Facilities Design Review and Construction, Section 129805 requires a SE to seal Hospitals.
The Education Code, Division 1, Part 10.5 School Facilities, Chapter 3 Construction of School Buildings, Section 17329 allows a CE or SE to seal Schools (Surprisingly !! ??)
The Business and Professions Code, Division 3, Chapter 7 Professional Engineers (defines the Board of PE and Land Surveyors), seems to be silent on what an SE and CE may do. (Surprisingly !! ??)