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RE: Engineers involved with UBC

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With respect to the ASCE 7 wind map, it seems nothing short of magical that
there is a "contour" line between 85 and 90 mph wind speeds that exactly
follows the eastern boundaries of California, Oregon, and Washington.  (It
certainly is easy to remember, though.)

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Michael Valley, P.E., S.E.                       E-mail: mtv(--nospam--at)skilling.com
Skilling Ward Magnusson Barkshire Inc.                  Tel:(206)292-1200
1301 Fifth Ave, #3200,  Seattle  WA 98101-2699          Fax:        -1201

> -----Original Message-----
> From: CarlS95(--nospam--at)aol.com [mailto:CarlS95(--nospam--at)aol.com]
> Sent: Wednesday, March 22, 2000 9:16 AM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: Engineers involved with UBC
>
>
> Charles Greenlaw wrote:
>
> <<Why ASCE 7 is different I do not know. Maybe ASCE does not rely
> on seismic
> code complexity as its basis for reputation and self-esteem, and makes up
> for it with wind code complexity. A cynic might know, if you can
> find one.>>
>
> But still, the seismic codes are not to be outdone.  As added
> proof, compare
> the NEHRP seismic maps to the new wind map in ASCE 7-95.  It
> takes 3 hours
> just to unfold the seismic maps while the new wind map can be
> memorized in 20
> seconds or less.
>
> Carl Sramek
>
>
>