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FW: Wind Load on Buildings

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Most of my design work concerns R/C buildings, and the issue of wind
parallel to walls doesn't really come up. However, I have dealt with it wrt
existing "butler" buildings (our name for them here), which are the mass
produced predesigned/fabricated steel frame warehouses.  These usually have
moment frames in one direction, bracing the other (usually transverse)
direction.

Accounting for the suction action of wind when it is parallel to walls HAS
controlled in some cases, simply because of the bowed out shape of the
frames when there is uplift on the roof and suction on both walls (causing
the frame to blow outward).  This has been true particularly because the
bracing on the inside flanges of the frames, which are all (roof and walls)
in compression, is often times nonexistent, leading to instability in the
columns/beams.  Of course, the tension induced in the columns due to roof
uplift offsets the compression to a certain degree, but it has still caused
me some heartburn in the past.

BTW, when I related the analysis back to the UBC, I simply used Cq=.7, same
as wind parallel to a ridge or roof.

My $.02

T. Eric R. Gillham PE
PO Box 3207 Agana Guam 96932
Ph: (671) 477-9224
Fax: (671) 477-3456
Pgr: 720-8891

eric(--nospam--at)gk2guam.com


-----Original Message-----
From: Mark D. Anderson [mailto:mda(--nospam--at)alaska.net]
Sent: Tuesday, March 21, 2000 5:35 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: Wind Load on Buildings


I was involved in some of the proposals concerning the rewrite of this
section for the 1982 UBC, and recall that we proposed the use of
"non-windward" walls for "leeward" walls, but it didn't fly.  My
understanding was that the prevailing point of view was that the issue was
meant to be addressed by considering as many different wind directions as
necessary to envelope all possible effects.  Wind loading of sidewalls
was/is considered to be provided for by application of leeward wall effects.

Mark D. Anderson

----- Original Message -----
From: <RajSTC(--nospam--at)aol.com>
To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Sent: Monday, March 20, 2000 7:57 AM
Subject: Wind Load on Buildings


> ASCE 7 prescribes wind pressure on side walls, in addition to pressure on
> windward and leeward walls.  However, UBC does not prescribe pressure on
side
> walls. (Table 16-H). Any comments?  Thanks.
>
> P. Rajendran
> Service & Technology Corporation
> 105 SW Penn
> Bartlesville, OK 74003
> Ph: 918 336 8161  FAX: 918 336 8265
>
>