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Re: Anchored Sheet Pile Walls

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It is not uncommon for the construction to be "top down". In other words,
the sheet piling is driven prior to the excavation taking place. After
excavating to the depth of the first row of tiebacks, the tiebacks are
installed. No cantilever condition for this method of construction other
than the short cantilever above the tieback.

Not saying this is the only way it's done, it's just the only way I've done
it.

Regards,
Mark

----- Original Message -----
From: PEC - Lake City <pec(--nospam--at)isgroup.net>
To: Seaint <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>; StrucTX <structx(--nospam--at)topica.com>
Sent: Friday, April 07, 2000 5:19 AM
Subject: Anchored Sheet Pile Walls


> >From what I've seen, anchored sheet pile walls are typically analyzed in
> their "final" state, that is, all of the fill is in place along with the
tie
> backs.
>
> During construction, however, the wall is a cantilevered wall until the
> tiebacks are in place.  If the tiebacks are located near the top of the
> wall, there could be a fair amount of deflection in the wall before the
tie
> backs are installed.
>
> Is temporary bracing normally used to provide stability, limit
deflections,
> etc. during construction?
>
> David Finley, P.E.
> PEC - Lake City
>
>
>