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RE: RE: Flowable fill

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Edward,

The ACI Committee 229 Report that I have is a bit dated, but it includes
sections on light weight CLSM and the foaming agents required to create the
light weight mixes.  Cellular concrete uses a foaming agent to create the
lightweight mix, and I would assume that it falls under the ACI 229.

Regards,
Harold Sprague


> -----Original Message-----
> From:	Edward Arrington [SMTP:Earringt(--nospam--at)ENG.CI.LA.CA.US]
> Sent:	Monday, May 15, 2000 2:18 PM
> To:	seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject:	Re: RE: Flowable fill
> 
> Harold, would cellular concrete fall under this ACI classification also?
> 
> Regards,
> edward arrington
> 
> >>> SpragueHO(--nospam--at)bv.com 05/15/00 11:08AM >>>
> Patrick,
> 
> This is a pretty good slide show on flowable fill.
> http://www.irmca.com/flowfill/ 
> 
> The ACI committee 229 is on CLSM (controlled low strength materials).
> 
> The mixes I have seen go in at about 140 pcf wet density.  And cure to
> about
> 130 pcf.  They can support the weight of a man in about 4 hours.
> 
> There are light weight flowable fills also.  I have used them with a wet
> density of 30 pcf and an oven dry density of 21 pcf.
> 
> In answer to your questions:
> 1.	It is a fluid.
> 2.	140 pcf for normal CLSM.  30 pcf for the real light weight stuff.
> 3.	It depends on how much subsidence you can tolerate see the ACI 229
> report.  The only lift height limitations that I know of are based on
> hydrostatic pressure.
> 
> 
> Regards,
> Harold Sprague
> 
> 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From:	Pat Ebner [SMTP:PEbner(--nospam--at)younglove-const.com] 
> > Sent:	Monday, May 15, 2000 12:04 PM
> > To:	seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org 
> > Subject:	Flowable fill
> > 
> > We have a below grade tunnel which the contractor wants to backfill
> > against using flowable fill.  The walls of the tunnel are reinforced
> > concrete and are 14' max. tall.  I have several questions regarding the
> > pressure the flowable fill will generate against the walls.
> > 
> > 1)   Is the pressure a fluid pressure or is it dependant on the rate of
> > placement?
> > 
> > 2)   If it is a fluid pressure, what would be a typical unit weight for
> > the fill?
> > 
> > 3)   Should the fill be placed in multiple lifts?  If so, how much time
> > should there be between the pouring of the lifts and how deep should the
> > lifts be?
> > 
> > Any other input is welcome.
> > 
> > Thank you.
> > 
> > Patrick Ebner, P.E.
> > 
> > 
> 
> 
> 
>