Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

Re: RSDG: Residential Structural Design Guide: 2000 Edition

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
Dennis, thanks for the report on this breakthrough residential design guide.

As to the SE Assns getting back in step with the rest of the marchers, and
ceasing to trip them up, I agree with your estimate of the problem (below.)

But I would prefer that the state SEA I have been in since 1970 would
instead voluntarily drop out of attempting to originate or manipulate code
applying to one and two family residential construction. There are already
too many acts SEAOC needs to regain competence in, and needs to re-establish
decent conduct with respect to, to stray so far outside its regular areas of
concern. In other words, there are more immediate and pressing internal
dysfunctions to be remedied first.

It looks like residential structures are in plenty of good hands without the
"help" of the SEA's.

Those of us who have been primarily affiliated with the SEA's would do well
to stop beating the dead SEA horse and switch our efforts to working
directly to NAHB, HUD, NF&PA, etc.  

Charles O. Greenlaw SE   Sacramento CA
--------------------------------------------
At 11:00 AM 05/22/2000 -0700, you wrote:
        ...
>SEA needs to put their feet back on the ground and start looking at single
>and multi-family dwellings in a practical light - balancing life safety,
>good performance and economics.

>Finally, as I mentioned before, there is a major discontinuity between SEA
>and other organizations working for the design and construction of
>affordable housing in this country. It's SEA's responsibility to bridge this
>gap and join these organizations in the work they are doing. Without total
>cooperation between professional organizations we remain a series of
>disconnected elements unproductively working in different directions. This
>is a very important document, in my opinion, as it is the first attempt to
>bring the building industry together with the professionals (architects and
>engineers). There is still a long way to go, but this is a hell of a good
>start.