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RE: polypropylene fibers

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Scott,

I tend to go to the people that put down more square feet of industrial
crack free slab on grade than just about anyone in the country.  That is
Kalman flooring.  Industrial flooring is their only business, and they do it
well.  Request a copy of Robert Ytterberg's article "Shrinkage & Curling of
Slabs on Grade" published in Concrete International.  They go through every
ingredient in concrete and what is attributed to various forms of cracking.


Their practice is to go 100' joint to joint, and they get very few cracks.

You will need to consider 2 things for a live stock application aside from a
relatively crack free floor.  You will need slip resistance and an
impervious surface.  The cracking is a subset issue of imperviousness.

To get impervious concrete you can go with the metacaolin / calcined clay
cements and use the suggestions of Ytterberg.  Especially look at the
details of the slip plane at the base of the slab.  You need to detail the
joints to allow the concrete to shrink to the center of the area bounded by
construction joints.  The secret in crack free slabs on grade are curing,
details, and mix design.

If you can use a broom finish, it is the cheapest way to get slip
resistance.  If not, there are topically applied finishes, and aggregate
containing coatings.

Regards,
Harold Sprague


> -----Original Message-----
> From:	Scott E Maxwell [SMTP:smaxwell(--nospam--at)engin.umich.edu]
> Sent:	Monday, June 19, 2000 9:08 PM
> To:	'seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org'
> Subject:	RE: polypropylene fibers
> 
> George & Harold,
> 
> Thanks for the info.
> 
> I think I should clarify little.  The steel fibers are not intended for
> the plastic shrinkage cracks, but as the primary reinforcement.
> 
> The polypropylene fiber (or peach fuzz as my boss calls it) is intended as
> secondary reinforcment with the intend that it would help with plastic
> shrinkage cracking and curing/drying cracking (particularly at the top of
> the slab).
> 
> We would like to minimize the cracking without getting too ridiculously
> restrictive with the control/construction joint spacing.
> 
> Basically, I have four pole barns that will house livestock.  Two are
> about 40ft x 160 ft and the other two are 40 ft x 200 ft.  The concern is
> to minimize cracking to prevent urine and other bodily functions from
> migrating to areas where germs/bacteria could congregate.
> 
> Any suggestions/comments?
> 
> Thanks,
> 
> Scott Maxwell
> 
> On Mon, 19 Jun 2000, George Muste wrote:
> 
> > Check the ACI 544.1R and 544.2R  for design and properties of material.
> > Please check the following sites for more details on these types of
> fibers.
> > The technical managers or sale person may help.   To reduce the plastic
> > shrinkage,  it is recommended to use polypropylene fibers - I never
> heard of
> > using both types of fibers at the same time to reduce plastic shrinkage.
> > 
> > The following are manufactures or distributors of polypropylene fibers,
> in
> > addition to Synthetic Industries (fibermesh).  Please check their
> websites
> > or call them for additional information.
> > 
> > http://www.durafiber.com/products.htm
> > http://www.fortacorp.com/product.html
> > http://www.graceconstruction.com/
> > http://www.masterbuilders.com/
> > http://www.kapejo.com/
> > OMI Concrete Specialists, IN, 219.436.7498 
> > http://www.qcconprod.com/main_index.html
> > Brett Admixtures, MN, 612.942.5470
> > http://www.grtinc.com/polmesf.html
> > 
> > Regards,
> > George Muste
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Scott E Maxwell [mailto:smaxwell(--nospam--at)engin.umich.edu]
> > Sent: Monday, June 19, 2000 11:21 AM
> > To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> > Subject: polypropylene fibers
> > 
> > 
> > Has anyone used polypropylene fibers in addition to either steel fibers
> or
> > regular reinforcement to help reduce initial plastic shrickage cracks?
> > 
> > If so, what other manufacturer's are out there in addition to Fibermesh?
> > 
> > Thanks,
> > 
> > Scott Maxwell
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> 
>