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Re: Who wants to be an engineer?

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Well, here's my take......

I have a BSCE from MIT and a M.Arch from UCBerkeley.

At MIT, I hung out at the architecture department....with none other than
Nicholas Negroponte, Mr. Digital.

At CAL, I hung out at the engineering department, and had classes with Boris
Bresler, T.Y. Lin, Graham Powell, Ed Wilson. At the same time, at Wurster
Hall I realized my desire to become knowledgeable in tension Membrane
Structures, having designed and built a model of one of the first Cable Dome
structures, refutting those who said it couldn't be done.

Went on to design and supervise numerous installations of membrane
structures, and was on teams that designed and supervised structures such as
Georgia Dome, St. Petersburgh Dome, Denver Airport, Tokyo Dome, etc.

At UC Extension I have attended classes given by David Bonneville, Jay Love,
Nias Nazir, Joe Ubarski.

I have attended seminars given by S.K. Ghosh, Chuck Salmon, Buckminster
Fuller, Frei Otto

FEMA has seminars given by prominent engineers from throughout the US.

It's really not where you learn, but how interested you are in learning.

That's why I am with those who believe it's good to have an M.S,. or, heaven
forbid, a Ph.D., but not essential, nor should the last two become
requirements.

So...if I knew then....what I know now....about different paths to becoming
a professional.....I wouldn't change a thing.

jim korff pe
structural compoites, inc.

Kierkegaard: "to label me is to negate me".
----- Original Message -----
From: <jwalsh(--nospam--at)saii.com>
To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Sent: Tuesday, June 20, 2000 11:08 AM
Subject: Who wants to be an engineer?


>
>
> This thread reminded me of a story an old engineer and mentor told me:
>
> When I first graduated, I thought my education was pretty good, but I
wished I
> had learned more of the practical design skills necessary to be a
productive
> engineer.
>
> After 8 years,  I thought my education was pretty good, but I wished I had
> learned more theory on the behavior of materials, the background behind
code
> formulas, and more sophisticated analysis procedures.  I was facing more
complex
> problems without the right tools.
>
> After 15 years, I thought my education was pretty good, but I wished I had
> learned more about managing and dealing with different kinds of people -
within
> and outside the company.  Aren't most problems really people problems?
>
> After 25 years, I thought my education was pretty good, but I wished I had
> learned more about business and financial management.  I was lost
reviewing our
> company financial statements, and even outside the firm clients and
projects are
> all driven by money.
>
> After 35 years, I thought my education was pretty good, but I wished I had
> learned more about the really meaningful things in life, like art,
literature,
> philosophy, history.
>
>
>