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RE: Steel Beam Reinforcing

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Page 129, 3rd paragraph "Reinforcing Steel Members and the Effects of
Welding", 4th Quarter, AISC Journal discusses the testing by O'Sullivan.
The 6th paragraph discusses plastic flow.

Tide, "Basic Considerations When Reinforcing Existing Steel Structures",
AISC Proceedings, National Engineering Conference, New Orleans, LA, April
1987, p 53-4, "Residual Stresses" discusses varying stresses within a
section.  P 53-6 "Variable Stress Levels".  Also look at the figures showing
residual stresses and temperature distributions during welding.

Tide, "Effects of Fabrication on Local Stress Conditions", WJE. (I know it
was published, but I don't know where).  Sect. "Origins of Residual Stress"
and "Strength and Deformation of Connections".

Donoven, Izbickas, & Mriani, "Reinforcing Roof Truss Frames Under Load",
Civil Engineering, April, 1984.

Spraragen, Grapnel, "Reinforcing Structures Under Load, " Welding Journal,
Research Supplement 65-s 23, Feb 1944.

O'Sullivan, Strengthening of Steel Structures Under Load, Proceeding Paper
N0. 5881, London Institute of Civil Engineers, January 1953.

For horizontal shear stress and weld design:
Blodgett, Design of Welded Structures, p 2.4-2.


Regards,
Harold Sprague


> -----Original Message-----
> From:	Scott E Maxwell [SMTP:smaxwell(--nospam--at)engin.umich.edu]
> Sent:	Wednesday, July 19, 2000 4:05 PM
> To:	seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject:	RE: Steel Beam Reinforcing
> 
> Harold,
> 
> I have a copy of the article, but haven't had a chance to really read it.
> Based upon just a brief glance at it, it seems to talk mostly about axial
> members (columns).  Since you are more familiar with the article, does it
> go on to sight any "testing" done on reinforcement of beams?
> 
> Scott Maxwell, PE, SE
> 
> 
> On Wed, 19 Jul 2000, Sprague, Harold O. wrote:
> 
> > 
> > Roger,
> > 
> > My fingers mis-spoke.  I too, do not design elements to yield.  What I
> meant
> > to say was design to a given stress represented as a percentage of yield
> > strength.  The whole point of Tides work was that you get a significant
> > amount of stress redistribution in a welded composite member resulting
> in
> > the strength predicated on the composite shape and is not predicated on
> the
> > initial elemental stresses.  The limitations are buckling and
> deflections.  
> > 
> > Tide cites some interesting tests including a truss reinforced in the
> loaded
> > and unloaded condition.
> > 
> > Regards,
> > Harold Sprague
> > 
> > 
> > > -----Original Message-----
> > > From:	Roger Turk [SMTP:73527.1356(--nospam--at)compuserve.com]
> > > Sent:	Wednesday, July 19, 2000 2:42 PM
> > > To:	seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> > > Subject:	RE: Steel Beam Reinforcing
> > > 
> > > Harold,
> > > 
> > > Since I do not design for steel to yield, I worry very much about what
> 
> > > the stress is in each part of a built-up beam at each stage of
> loading.
> > > 
> > > A. Roger Turk, P.E.(Structural)
> > > Tucson, Arizona
> > > 
> > > Harold Sprague wrote:
> > > 
> > > >>Roger,
> > > 
> > > You might want to review "Reinforcing Steel Members and the Effects of
> > > Welding", by R. H. R. Tide, AISC Engineering Journal 4th Quarter 1990,
> and
> > > some of the other works by Tide and Spraragen (referenced in Tide's
> > > paper).
> > > 
> > > Tide discusses at length reinforcing members both unloaded and loaded.
> He
> > > also presents several listed references.  After discussing reinforcing
> > > issues with Mr. Tide several years ago and reading various references,
> my
> > > practice has been to not worry too much about which component of a
> > > reinforced element is stressed to yield and which ones are not
> stressed as
> > > much.  I look more at the average stresses of the composite member.
> As a
> > > result, the initial stress in the parent member is not as important.
> It
> > > can't be totally ignored (like buckling), but it is not all that
> > > important.
> > > 
> > > When it comes to anticipated deflections, that is a different issue.
> > > 
> > > All of these issues came to a head several years ago when I had to
> > > reinforce
> > > several trusses and beams that were highly stressed.  I did have
> occasion
> > > to
> > > shore and relieve stress on some elements, but for the most part it
> was a
> > > non-issue. 
> > > 
> > > The papers by Tide are much better than this meager synopsis.<<
> > > 
>  


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