Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

Re: Glass Railing

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
 

I had  a chance to look at the 1988 UBC Standards, table 54-1-a on page
1405 which list the Breaking stress levels- wind load relation ship.  When
I worked at a Beach community some 6 years age, this was very popular
design element to capture the Ocean Views.  In fact I used this table to
evaluate railing design.  Should you need a faxed copy, I have the Book and
will be glad to send you a coppy.

Samir Ghosn, P.E
Harris & Associates
(949) 655-3900 xt 360

At 04:22 PM 7/27/2000 -0700, you wrote:
>I don't know what the building code issues are outside of the basic OSHA
>requirements, but glass is one of those wierd materials that you really cant'
>use just by comparing ksi limits.  Metals assume a degree of toughness glass
>doesn't have.  Hopefully, the glass is for ornament only, ie, not the
retaining
>structure but is just pretty so people can put their hands on it as they look
>over a taller fence, hacking off the cleaning crew who will curse the
>architect.  Looking at the ASM Desktop Reference for Engineered Materials,
>strength ranges from 2.5 to 10.6 ksi, with Poisson Ratios ranging 0.17 to
0.33.
>The rails' properties will also depend on the geometry.  I would find out
what
>the vendor is publishing as their particular materials' property and design
>around that.
>
>If this is a situation where there is no stock rail material and you have the
>opportunity to design it from scratch, get to know your
vendor/manufacturer real
>well, dust off your old Strength of Materials books, and have fun.  Those are
>the kinds of jobs I like best.  Like others, I'm not fond of "cookbook
>engineering" with those magic constants and unexplained variables with the
>"insert value here, dummy" mentality.
>
>Bart Kemper, P.E.
>
>
>
>Brad Friederichs wrote:
>
>> Hello,
>>
>> Does anyone have an idea of how to design glass handrail.  The client wants
>> to span 1/2" tempered glass 6 ft. between vertical balustrades.  The
load at
>> the top of the 32" high glass panel is 50 plf.  The panel encloses a
balcony
>> area.
>>
>> What is the allowable or ultimate flexural capacity of glass?
>>
>> Thanks for your help.
>>
>> Brad Friederichs
>> VE Solutions, Inc.
>
>
>******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* *** 
>*   Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp 
>*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
>*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
>*   subscribe (no fee) to the list, send email to 
>*   admin(--nospam--at)seaint.org and in the body of the message type 
>*   "join seaint" (no quotes). To Unsubscribe, send email 
>*   to admin(--nospam--at)seaint.org and in the body of the message 
>*   type "leave seaint" (no quotes). For questions, send 
>*   email to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
>*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
>*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
>*   site at: http://www.seaint.org 
>******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** ****** ********
>


******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* *** 
*   Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp 
*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
*   subscribe (no fee) to the list, send email to 
*   admin(--nospam--at)seaint.org and in the body of the message type 
*   "join seaint" (no quotes). To Unsubscribe, send email 
*   to admin(--nospam--at)seaint.org and in the body of the message 
*   type "leave seaint" (no quotes). For questions, send 
*   email to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
*   site at: http://www.seaint.org 
******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** ****** ********