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Re: Local Area Network

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In the book "Peer-to-Peer Networking" which I bought a few years ago, the "rule
of thumb" was that P2P was fine up to about TEN computers. Beyond that, you need
a server.

Insofar as "all data in one place", that is not so hard to do with P2P. In fact,
as far as administration is concerned, P2P is the easiest to implement and
maintain--you just worry about your own workstation and let others worry about
theirs.

Since it is so inexpensive--and many small operations just don't need the
"benefits" of client-server--I think P2P is a great choice for the typical small
engineering office like mine.

All the other points made in this post are actually irrelevant, and the
"advantages" cited don't actually exist.

Lynn H wrote:
> There are a lot of reasons why we don't use a peer
> to peer system.
>

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