Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

RE: Lead Primed Structural Steel

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
We have had this case on a couple of occasions and the contractors have come
up with a great solution that is as easy as 1-2-3 without shrouded tools or
ventilation.

They use a product called CitrStrip.  Its citrus based as indicated by the
name.  When applied to paint on steel it takes it off like a charm down to
the bare metal with no residue/residual primer left.

It is readily available at any home improvement store.  Go to their website
and check it out.  http://www.citristrip.com/

Regards,

John Whitty

-----Original Message-----
From: Sprague, Harold O. [mailto:SpragueHO(--nospam--at)bv.com]
Sent: Thursday, September 21, 2000 10:32 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: Lead Primed Structural Steel


Charlie,

You should be concerned, but not overly.  OSHA requires proper safety
procedures for removing lead paint.  There are manufacturers of grinders
with self contained vacuum devices that remove the lead paint with minimal
loss to the atmosphere.  It is not as hazardous as asbestos.  Most major
painting contractors and many of the better steel erectors are aware of
proper procedures.

Welding and potential hazardous fumes are well presented in USACE TI 809-26
Welding - Design Procedures and Inspections.

Regards,
Harold Sprague


> -----Original Message-----
> From:	CanitzCF(--nospam--at)aol.com [SMTP:CanitzCF(--nospam--at)aol.com]
> Sent:	Wednesday, September 20, 2000 9:03 PM
> To:	seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject:	Lead Primed Structural Steel
>
> One of my current projects involves an existing structural steel building
> where some of the existing steel(W shapes) will be removed and
> re-installed.
> All of the steel is primed and since the structure was erected during the
> mid-60's, I'm concerned that the primer may be "red lead". Subsequent
> sampling and testing will verify if this is the case. If so, should I be
> concerned when the iron workers handle this material? In some cases, new
> steel will be welded to the existing steel. Should I be concerned about
> the
> resultant lead vapors? If the primer is removed via grinding or blasting,
> is
> it possible that nearby workers could inhale the air borne lead particles?
>
>
> TIA,
>
> Charlie Canitz, PE
> Bel Air, MD
>

******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* ***
*   Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp
*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers
*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To
*   subscribe (no fee) to the list, send email to
*   admin(--nospam--at)seaint.org and in the body of the message type
*   "join seaint" (no quotes). To Unsubscribe, send email
*   to admin(--nospam--at)seaint.org and in the body of the message
*   type "leave seaint" (no quotes). For questions, send
*   email to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you
*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted
*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web
*   site at: http://www.seaint.org
******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** ****** ********


******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* *** 
*   Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp 
*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
*   subscribe (no fee) to the list, send email to 
*   admin(--nospam--at)seaint.org and in the body of the message type 
*   "join seaint" (no quotes). To Unsubscribe, send email 
*   to admin(--nospam--at)seaint.org and in the body of the message 
*   type "leave seaint" (no quotes). For questions, send 
*   email to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
*   site at: http://www.seaint.org 
******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** ****** ********