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RE: SNOW LOADS IN "SITE SPECIFIC" REGION

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Teresa,

The Soil Conservation Service used to be a source of snow depths and 
weights.  IIRC, they (or the Forest Service) have snow courses on which they 
take periodic measurements.  Sometimes just depth of snow, sometimes the 
weight of a specific volume of snow.

It seems that budget cutbacks several years ago have closed a number of snow 
courses in Arizona.  I hope that the same thing has not happened in 
Pennsylvania.  (I understand that in some places you get more snow than 
we do!)

Hope this helps.

A. Roger Turk, P.E.(Structural)
Tucson, Arizona

Teresa Dellies wrote:

>>We are in need of help in determining what ground snow loads to use for a
building in eastern Pennsylvania. The BOCA and ASCE-7 maps tell us that the
loads are "site specific". The City Engineer tells us that they are not under
the jurisdiction of any codes for structural design! Anyone have any
suggestions where we might obtain "reliable" snow data? We tried the county
and other cities within a 20 mile radius but to no avail! Thank you in
advance.<<

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