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Re: Epoxy Grout for Rock Anchors

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You might want to look at the literature from some of the rock/soil anchor 
manufacturers that have complete systems including spacers, tremie tubes, 
corrosion protected bars, etc as well as the grout to go along with them.  
Epoxy products are not normally used for these anchors, but rather sometimes 
poleyester resin sausages or cement based grouts.  I would lean towards the 
cement based grout for this.  

Most traditional anchoring materials for concrete (Covert, Ramset, Hilti 
etc.) are designed for shorter length and smaller diameter anchors.  Our 
CIA-Gel 7000 epoxy has one of the longest working times available, and we 
have done No. 11 bars (1 3/8 in dia) 10 feet deep, but the contractor needs 
to work quickly.  On the other hand, we have a true 3 component epoxy grout 
that is flowable, has a 4 hour pot life in large mass, and a 13,000 psi 
compressive strength.  However, the low temperature will always be a problem 
for epoxies.

Try the systems from DYWIDAG, Williams Form Engineering, and Fosroc.  Let me 
know if you need contact info for any of these.

Howard Silverman, PE
Covert Operations, Inc.
Adhesives, Anchoring & Crack Injection Systems
Long Beach, CA
www.covertoperations.com
(800) 827-7229


In a message dated 11/9/0 7:02:21 AM, smallett(--nospam--at)dillon.ca writes:

<< I have a project in which I am utilizing grouted rock anchors to resist 
uplift
forces. Depth of vertical anchors is 15 feet. Anchors will be epoxy
coated rebar. The three inch drilled holes will likely have up to 10 feet of
groundwater in them.

I am searching for an epoxy grout product that is insensitive to the
presence of water and will cure in 5 degrees Celsius (40 degrees F)
conditions. I have talked to a couple of suppliers, but they are wary
about the wet conditions. Any recommendations?

To avoid standing water in the hole, we may run a sleeve down the hole,
pump the water out and tremie the grout in as we pull the sleeve out. But
we still have to deal with wet, cold conditions for the grout.

Your suggestions welcome.

Steven A. Mallett, P.Eng.
 >>

--- Begin Message ---
You might want to look at the literature from some of the rock/soil anchor 
manufacturers that have complete systems including spacers, tremie tubes, 
corrosion protected bars, etc as well as the grout to go along with them.  
Epoxy products are not normally used for these anchors, but rather sometimes 
poleyester resin sausages or cement based grouts.  I would lean towards the 
cement based grout for this.  

Most traditional anchoring materials for concrete (Covert, Ramset, Hilti 
etc.) are designed for shorter length and smaller diameter anchors.  Our 
CIA-Gel 7000 epoxy has one of the longest working times available, and we 
have done No. 11 bars (1 3/8 in dia) 10 feet deep, but the contractor needs 
to work quickly.  On the other hand, we have a true 3 component epoxy grout 
that is flowable, has a 4 hour pot life in large mass, and a 13,000 psi 
compressive strength.  However, the low temperature will always be a problem 
for epoxies.

Try the systems from DYWIDAG, Williams Form Engineering, and Fosroc.  Let me 
know if you need contact info for any of these.

Howard Silverman, PE
Covert Operations, Inc.
Adhesives, Anchoring & Crack Injection Systems
Long Beach, CA
www.covertoperations.com
(800) 827-7229


In a message dated 11/9/0 7:02:21 AM, smallett(--nospam--at)dillon.ca writes:

<< I have a project in which I am utilizing grouted rock anchors to resist 
uplift
forces. Depth of vertical anchors is 15 feet. Anchors will be epoxy
coated rebar. The three inch drilled holes will likely have up to 10 feet of
groundwater in them.

I am searching for an epoxy grout product that is insensitive to the
presence of water and will cure in 5 degrees Celsius (40 degrees F)
conditions. I have talked to a couple of suppliers, but they are wary
about the wet conditions. Any recommendations?

To avoid standing water in the hole, we may run a sleeve down the hole,
pump the water out and tremie the grout in as we pull the sleeve out. But
we still have to deal with wet, cold conditions for the grout.

Your suggestions welcome.

Steven A. Mallett, P.Eng.
 >>


--- End Message ---