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RE: Steel column flange damage repair

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Paul Ransom,
 The process of heat straightening is, as I have indicated previously, an
art. The procedure is learned and practiced by men like Ray Stitt or George
Shenifeld, who I believe have been  retired for some time.  However, many
of today's fabricators have developed staff that are competent in the
process.

In Canada, I would contact ADF in Montreal, or a plate fabricator, one who
fabricates tanks, hoppers or large plate fabrications.

I, personally have been involved with developing beam and girder cambering
procedures, repairing several 10'-0" diameter cooling tower vents that had
been distorted by fire and developing several repairs of damaged flanges;
all done with properly applied and controlled heat and without reinforcing.
If done properly, the heat straightening will produce a repair that is
practically invisible and as noted by Charlie Carter of AISC, may not
require the addition of a reinforcing plate.


David I. Ruby, S.E.
Chair, Coalition of American Structural Engineers
President, Ruby & Associates, P.C.
30445 Northwestern Hwy., Suite 310
Farmington Hills, MI 48334-3102

Phone:            (248) 865-8855
Fax:              (248) 865-9449
Cellular:         (248) 514-2677
E-mail:           druby(--nospam--at)rubyusa.com

-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Ransom [mailto:ad026(--nospam--at)hwcn.org]
Sent: Sunday, December 10, 2000 12:01 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: Steel column flange damage repair


> From: "David I. Ruby, P.E." <druby(--nospam--at)rubyusa.com>

> Back to the hydraulic jack. If the bent flange is heated to cherry red
along
> the bend, and the jack is used a means of moving the flange inline there
is
> little to no chance to damage the remaining portion of the member.
>
> David I. Ruby, S.E.
> Chair, Coalition of American Structural Engineers

It seems that there are techniques which don't require the use of a
hydraulic jack. Are there any professionals at the Coalition of American
Structural Engineers who could describe such a method?

--
Paul Ransom, P. Eng.
Civil/Structural/Project/International
Burlington, Ontario, Canada
<mailto:ad026(--nospam--at)hwcn.org> <http://www.hwcn.org/~ad026/civil.html>