Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

RE: Anchor Bolt Specs

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
Title: RE: Anchor Bolt Specs

>I came across a specification for anchor bolts
>for a building calling for A354 grade BC. I am
>familiar only with A325&A490 specification.

ASTM A325 and A490 are for steel-to-steel structural bolting only, not steel-to-concrete anchorage, because the have special heading and threading requirements and are generally available in lengths up to 8 in. only. ASTM A354 is the strength level equivalent of ASTM A490 in a rod specification with more general heading, threading and other requirements.

I'd also recommend that you take a look at ASTM F1554, which is a relatively new material specification that covers hooked, headed and threaded and nutted anchor rods in three strength grades: 36, 55 and 105. Read about it here (if that link wraps, be sure and paste it into the browser ending with "...+imoq3345").

    http://www.astm.org/cgi-bin/SoftCart.exe/DATABASE.CART/PAGES/F1554.htm?L+mystore+imoq3345

Grade 36 is most commonly specified, although grades 55 and 105 are normally available when higher strength is required. ASTM F15554 grade 36 or, if its availability can be confirmed prior to specification, ASTM F1554 grade 55 with weldability supplement S1 and the carbon equivalent formula in ASTM F1554 Section S1.5.2.1 can be specified to allow welded field correction should the anchor rods be placed incorrectly in the field. ASTM F1554 grades 36 and 105 are essentially the anchor-rod equivalents of the generic rod specifications ASTM A36 and A193 grade B7, respectively. ASTM F1554 grade 55, when specified with the weldability supplement, is similar to an ASTM A572 material that is intermediate between grades 50 and 60.

Several other ASTM Specifications can also be used. For applications involving unheaded rods, ASTM A36, A193, A307, A354, A449, A572, A588 and A687 can be specified. For applications involving headed rods, ASTM A307, A354 and A449 can be specified.

You can read more about each of these (and other structural-steel-related materials) here:

    http://www.engr.psu.edu/ae/steelstuff/matls.htm

Note that the text above is a bit of an update based upon availability to the text that you'll find at this link.

Charlie