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RE: American Know-How

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I couldn't have said it better.....


David L. Fisher, SE, PE
Senior Principal
Fisher+Horos Structural Engineers
372 West Ontario
Chicago, Illinois
USA
312.573.1701

-----Original Message-----
From: Haan, Scott M. [mailto:HaanSM(--nospam--at)ci.anchorage.ak.us]
Sent: Saturday, March 10, 2001 5:46 PM
To: 'seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org'
Subject: RE: American Know-How


It is Saturday. For the love of God, please quit thinking about building
codes and drink a beer or something.

Scott M Haan  P.E.
Plan Review Engineer
Building Safety Division http://muni.org/building,
Development Services Department,
Municipality of Anchorage
phone: 907-343-8183   fax: 907-249-7399


> -----Original Message-----
> From:	gbuydens [SMTP:gbuydens(--nospam--at)pacificcoast.net]
> Sent:	Saturday, March 10, 2001 2:40 PM
> To:	seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject:	Re: American Know-How
>
> I just want to correct a comment made by one of my fellow canadians. CSA
> stands for Canadian Standards Association. It puts out thousands of
> different standards but it does not put out the National Building
> Code(NBC)
> or the adopted version of NBC that each province adopts as the provincial
> building code, i.e.BC Building Code or Alberta Building Code.  The NBC is
> put together by a number of different code committes that work through
> IRC(Institute for Research and Construction) to develope the NBC. NBC will
> reference CSA standards relating to the design of different materials such
> as wood, steel, concrete, glass,aluminum just to mention a few. NBC also
> references a number of other CSA standards as well as ULC standards, NFPA,
> CGSB standards just to name a few. You may find some of the same people
> sitting on both NBC's code committees as CSA's committees. If one looks in
> Section 2 of NBC, you will find a list of standards referenced in NBC.
> Just
> thought I would like to avoid any confusion.
>
> Gerry Buydens
> Former member of BC Building Standards Branch
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: <h.d.richardson(--nospam--at)home.com>
> To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
> Sent: March 10, 2001 2:53 PM
> Subject: Re: American Know-How
>
>
> > Mark Gilligan, Fellow Engineers,
> >
> > You should not be amazed by the extensive use of American construction
> > codes throughout the world.  You Americans lead the world in the
> > development of building construction science and related codes because
> > you lead the world in the need to use building construction science and
> > related codes.  It's only logical that developing countries that do not
> > have the resources to develop their own codes and standards would choose
> > to copy yours.
> >
> > The only deficiency in your codes is that there are too many of them
> > and that they are all too independent of one another.  An added
> > complication is that there are also too many internal barriers to free
> > use on a national basis and too many political jurisdictions made up of
> > non engineers who want to do their own thing.  Unfortunately, no one saw
> > the need to make this part of the Canada - U.S.A free trade agreement a
> > few years ago or we would all now be better off using the same codes.
> >
> > Let me tell you how our Canadian codes are co-ordinated because I think
> > we've done a better job in this area than you have.  More than half a
> > century ago we in Canada developed an organization called Canadian
> > Standards Association (C.S.A.) which serves as a clearing house for all
> > Canadian codes and standards and which fills some, but not all, of the
> > roles of your A.I.S.C., A.C.I., A.S.T.M., and a number of others. We
> > still have our own technical societies, such as E.I.C., and local
> > chapters of some of yours such, as A.C.I., but they do not prepare codes
> > in Canada.  In Canada we have the C.S.A. National Building Code
> > Committee which has several subcommittees, one each for steel, concrete,
> > timber, etc., etc.  Now this has a number of advantages: all of our load
> > factors are the same whether we are designing in concrete, steel, or
> > whatever;  engineers can be more mobile because they don't have to spend
> > months learning a new code for each region; they also can learn faster
> > and keep up to date more easily because there is only one code to
> > learn.  In fact, he only disadvantage that I can think of is that we no
> > longer have a competitive advantage over non residents who don't know
> > our codes.
> >
> > I encourage you all to promote action to follow our lead in
> > centralizing the development of codes and standards; it can only lead to
> > our mutual economic advantage.  At the very least, those of you in
> > private practise will have less codes to buy and everyone will need to
> > spend less time keeping up to date on code developments.
> >
> > You say the Philippines is using the 1988 U.B.C.?  Good start!  They
> > should now be encouraged to upgrade to the 1997 edition.  You may be
> > interested in knowing that the Cayman Islands is using the Florida
> > Building Code but I don't know what edition.
> >
> >
> >
> > Respecfully submitted,
> >
> >
> > H. Daryl Richardson
> > Calgary, Alberta, Canada
> > Mark Gilligan wrote:
> > >
> > > Another instance of blatant American Code Imperialism . : )
> > >
> > > >>>For Reinforced concrete design, we use Ultimate
> > > Strength Design Method based on ACI 318-83. In my
> > > opinion this is pretty much same as ACI code and it is
> > > totally acceptable if you use ACI code for reinforced
> > > concrete design.<<<<
> > >
> > > It amazes me the prevalence of American construction codes in use in
> other
> > > countries.
> > >
> > > In the Philippines the structural code is a literal copy of the
> provisions
> > > in the 1988 UBC.
> > >
> > > In Saudi Arabia they accept, and seem to prefer, US Codes in spite of
> the
> > > fact that the  British had great influence in the past.
> > >
> > > A few engineering students go to college in the US, return to home
> country,
> > > become responsible for major projects where they need to adopt
> technical
> > > provisions, So they use the US codes that they are familiar with.
> > >
> > > Note the number of foreign chapters of ACI.
> > >
> > > American Imperialism is not dead it is just transformed. : )
> > >
> > > Mark Gilligan
> > > Berkeley, Calif.
> > >
> >
> >
>
>