Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

RE: Dome Analysis

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
Title: RE: Dome Analysis

We did the same thing.

-- Joel

-------------------------
Joel Adair, EIT
Halff Associates, Inc.
E-mail: jadair(--nospam--at)halff.com
-------------------------
-----Original Message-----
From: Dan Goodrich [mailto:dang(--nospam--at)karren.com]
Sent: Thursday, March 15, 2001 12:38 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: Dome Analysis


Beware of following this book exactly though!  It is full of typo's/errors. 
At least the 2nd version does.  Particularly the example problems. 
The first day of class we went through the book and fixed typos.

Dan Goodrich, P.E.

----- Original Message -----
From: Adair, Joel
To: 'seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org'
Sent: Thursday, March 15, 2001 12:33 PM
Subject: RE: Dome Analysis


If you don't already have it, you may want to track down a copy of "Thin Shell Concrete Structures" by David P. Billington, published by McGraw-Hill, 1990, 1982.  It was the text that we used in my thin shells class in school.  When we bought our copies at that time (1997), it was a "McGraw-Hill Classic Textbook Reissue", so I'm not sure if you could purchase a new copy from McGraw-Hill, or if you would have to find it through a used book store or something.  It has closed-form solutions (brush off your calculus skills) for, among other things, elliptical domes.  You could do as we did in class, and develop spreadsheets using the equations in the book to design your structure (probably not very practical in the "real world"), or you could use the book to do a few spot checks of the results from your computer model, whatever program you end up using (always a very good idea in the "real world").

Billington does a fairly decent job of boiling down the complicated calculus into something that's useful in practice.  But for those who really want to understand where the equations for the various forces come from, there are plenty of fourth-order partial differential equations to keep you busy for hours.

Have fun! 
-------------------------
Joel Adair, EIT
Halff Associates, Inc.
E-mail: jadair(--nospam--at)halff.com
-------------------------


-----Original Message-----
From: Nels Roselund [mailto:n.roselund(--nospam--at)worldnet.att.net]
Sent: Thursday, March 15, 2001 12:01 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Dome Analysis


I need to model, analyze and design a reinforced concrete ellipsoid dome
that will support an existing unreinforced stone masonry roof over a
rectangular space.
What windows-compatible 3d structural analysis program would you recommend,
and why?
Nels Roselund
Structural Engineer



******* ***
*   Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp
*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers
*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To
*   subscribe (no fee) to the list, send email to
*   admin(--nospam--at)seaint.org and in the body of the message type
*   "join seaint" (no quotes). To Unsubscribe, send email
*   to admin(--nospam--at)seaint.org and in the body of the message
*   type "leave seaint" (no quotes). For questions, send
*   email to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you
*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted
*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web
*   site at: http://www.seaint.org ********