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Re: Engineering from Home - Protecting Perso

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Bill, you've been misled, perhaps by your "small business development
course".  

Incorporation is lovely, unless you're an engineer.  There is a very cute
legal thing (I believe in all states) called "Piercing the Corporate
Shield".  

I know this applies in Louisiana and Florida, because I've checked (after
the fact, when I incorporated in Louisiana).

Before you spend the $$$ on incorporation (assuming protection from
lawsuits is the main goal), I'd make sure the protection you want is
available to you as an engineer.  

I'll bet you a coke...   ;-)

Fountain

----------
> From: Bill Polhemus <bill(--nospam--at)polhemus.cc>
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: RE: Engineering from Home - Protecting Perso
> Date: Monday, April 02, 2001 1:43 PM
> 
> I am going to incorporate based on information gained from a small
business
> development course I have been taking through the University of Houston.
> 
> The fact is, a corporation WILL protect you from lawsuits, particularly
of
> the frivolous kind, because the corporation will be the entity that is
sued,
> not you personally.
> 
> Also, while you're right that you can't "contract away negligence", the
fact
> is that MOST lawsuits, and MOST jury awards, are for "frivolous reasons".
If
> you are at fault, you're at fault. But such a setup will prevent someone
> with a brief for just "getting" you for whatever reason, from coming away
> with anything of value.
> 
> A Subchapter "S" seems to be fairly easy to set up, and does not penalize
> you unduly from taxes.
> 
> William L. Polhemus, Jr., P.E.
> Polhemus Engineering Company
> Katy, Texas
> Phone 281-492-2251
> Fax 281-492-8203
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Roger Turk [mailto:73527.1356(--nospam--at)compuserve.com]
> Sent: Monday, April 02, 2001 3:19 PM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: Engineering from Home - Protecting Perso
> 
> 
> Michelle,
> 
> Unless your "corporation" is the registered structural engineer, the
> corporation does not protect anything.