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Re: bridge inspection

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There are dozens of Federal programs where Federal money is given to
cities and counties to be used on private property! One of the programs I
supervised a few years ago was to retrofit several thousand houses and
apartments with energy saving measures in Santa Monica.

Stan Scholl, P.E.
Laguna Beach, CA

On Fri, 27 Apr 2001 12:09:31 -0400 Roger Turk <73527.1356(--nospam--at)compuserve.com>
writes:
> Bill,
> 
> Unless Texas is different from other states (O.K., I *know* Texas is 
> 
> different from other states), political subdivisions cannot expend 
> public 
> monies on maintenance of private property, even if they are 
> reimbursed.  Here 
> in Arizona, in particular Pima County, even subdivision streets 
> can't be 
> maintained by County forces until they are accepted into the County 
> street 
> system.
> 
> That said, I would suggest that you use AASHTO's "Manual for 
> Condition 
> Evaluation of Bridges" for your evaluation.  *If* the largest 
> vehicle using 
> the bridge is a school bus, than I would use the H-15 criteria to 
> determine 
> adequacy and require the owners to post maximum load signs 
> reflecting the 
> actual load capacity.  The worst thing that can happen to you is for 
> you to 
> use your own however well intentioned criteria, which is less than 
> AASHTO's, 
> and have something happen to a school bus.
> 
> After the Silver Bridge disaster, which precipitated national bridge 
> 
> inspection programs, I inspected a couple of bridges for a county in 
> southern 
> Arizona.  One was a small, single span bridge which would be built 
> as a 
> culvert today and the other was a multi-span, single lane, wood 
> bridge.  At 
> one time, both bridges had had at least parts of their 
> superstructures washed 
> out.  The washed out parts of the superstructure had been replaced 
> with 
> salvaged steel from lord knows where.  The single span deck used 
> salvaged 
> compression chords from an old truss bridge as beams and had the 
> lacing side 
> installed up and the solid plate side down.  The deck was wood, and 
> all sorts 
> of debris fell into the cavity of the salvaged compression chords.  
> Analysis 
> showed that it should not have been able to support its own weight, 
> let alone 
> the weight of school buses that passed over the bridge while it was 
> being 
> inspected.  The bridge was immediately closed and a detour down into 
> the wash 
> was bladed until an adequate deck could be installed.  (For those of 
> you 
> without knowledge of Arizona, our rivers and washes are dry about 
> 350 days a 
> year, and maybe run torrentially for about 3 days a year.)
> 
> Re: Federal Funds:  I don't know of a county that doesn't receive 
> federal 
> highway funds one way or another.
> 
> HTH
> 
> A. Roger Turk, P.E.(Structural)
> Tucson, Arizona
> 
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