Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

Re: Engineering compensation

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
Yeah, but I thought you were just bragging.

Paul
----- Original Message -----
From: "Haan, Scott M." <HaanSM(--nospam--at)ci.anchorage.ak.us>
To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2001 12:42 PM
Subject: RE: Engineering compensation


> Paul:
>
> I also said I got a letter opener when I got my masters degree.
>
> Scott M Haan P.E.
> Plan Review Engineer
> Building Safety Division http://www.muni.org/building
> Development Services Department
> Municipality of Anchorage
> phone:907-343-8183  fax:907-249-7399
> mailto:haansm(--nospam--at)ci.anchorage.ak.us
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Paul Feather [mailto:pfeather(--nospam--at)san.rr.com]
> Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2001 11:39 AM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: Re: Engineering compensation
>
>
> Scott Haan wrote:
> >
> > There is a simple solution to having a higher salary and it is simply be
> > unwilling to work for less than you are worth.
> >
> I could not agree more.  This applies to private sector projects as well.
> Our office does not get many of the projects we provide proposals on,
> primarily because we are too expensive.  I learned along time ago that
there
> is a big difference between being paid what you are worth , being
> profitable, and being busy.
>
> There is an old story I like to think of:  "A manufacturing company has
> millions of dollars worth of complex in-line machinery.  The Industrial
> engineer who has been with the company for many years retires.  Soon after
> the equipment stops working and no-one is able to fix it.  Begrudgingly,
the
> old man comes out of retirement to look at the problem.  He walks around
for
> an hour looking and listening to the various components, finally taking a
> piece of chalk and marking a component saying "replace this".  They do and
> everything begins to work properly again.  The old man sends a bill for
> $50,000 to the company.  The accounting department flips out and demands
an
> itemized accounting of his services.  He scrawls on the invoice "one chalk
> mark, $1.00, knowing where to put it, $49,999"  he was promptly paid."
>
> Many complain that we are not compensated for the value we bring to a
> project. I ask you to look closely at your own practices, or the practices
> of your employer.  As I listen to many of our profession lament the level
of
> remuneration in our industry, I reflect upon the projects we don't get
> because other firms were 40% less than we were (I also wonder how the hell
> anyone can expect to earn a living, or even perform due diligence, at the
> proposed fee levels).
>
> We are not unrealistic in our proposed fees, or we would not get any work.
> The difference is finding clients who value the level of service and
> expertise you bring to a project and are willing to pay the little extra
for
> it.  This is not as hard as some may think.  The fact is if the project is
> truly successful, we look good, the client (Architect) looks good, there
are
> less construction problems, delays, and extras, so the ultimate client is
> happy (Owner), and lo and behold, we get more quality work.  We do not get
> all the work we seek, but we get enough at the right levels of
compensation.
>
> I ask you to apply your engineers perspective in a cold detached manner to
> the different "business" models in our industry (The "contractor"  low bid
> and look for extras practice, the "sweat shop" practice, the "production"
> practice, the "specialist" practice, the "quality" practice, the "service"
> practice, and so on).  Then look closely at where you and yours fit into
the
> overall picture.  The lack of value and compensation in our industry rests
> solely within.  If you do not like where you are in the spectrum, take
> positive steps to change things.  There will always be low bidders, and
yes
> they will get lots of work, but we do not have to compete with them, or
work
> for them.
>
> Stan posted an excellent response to a similar thread a couple of years(?)
> ago, regarding "being a rainmaker".  He should repost it again for this
one.
> Each of us will have a different balance of what constitutes success. I
need
> an awful lot of compensation to give up my Sunday golf :-)  And I am not
> willing to work endless hours for low fees.  If the majority of firms
would
> place a higher value on their services, the market would have to support
> higher compensation.  Until then, look to your own circumstances and begin
> there.
>
> Paul Feather
>
>
> *
> *   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers
> *   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To
> *   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
> *
> *   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
> *
> *   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you
> *   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted
> *   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web
> *   site at: http://www.seaint.org
>
> *
> *   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers
> *   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To
> *   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
> *
> *   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
> *
> *   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you
> *   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted
> *   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web
> *   site at: http://www.seaint.org
>


* 
*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
*   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
*
*   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
*
*   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
*   site at: http://www.seaint.org