Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

RE: new home noises

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
Martin,
Yes, this was my thought exactly and I told the owner yesterday that this
was the most reasonable conclusion to draw. The exterior walls were probably
not kiln dried lumber (although it is used commonly here) but there is bound
to be some differential settlement and shrinkage in the bearing walls as
well as settlement to the camber in the lower chord of the trusses when
loaded. I doubt (knowing the builder) that the interior walls were given
much clearance from the trusses and I believe that the bottom chord is
starting to bear on the interior metal stud walls.
I have been so busy that I called the owner and offered the information
without charge. He wants me to write it up in a report - which means that I
will make the visit to the home just to rule out any other site conditions
before starting the report.

I think when the interior walls started to bear the ceiling loads, the studs
are going into axial bending and causing the screws to release at least a
bit. I'm not sure if applying a straight edge to the face of the wall will
show much (if any) deflection as steel studs go in straight rather than
crowned like wood studs. If there is any "bowing" of the studs, it may be
noticeable and this would add additional evidence to support a professional
opinion.

Looks like we are all on a similar track here and I appreciate all of the
input I received from this thread. Thanks to all of you who are following
this thread.

Regards.
Dennis

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Martin W. Johnson [mailto:MWJ(--nospam--at)eqe.com]
> Sent: Tuesday, May 08, 2001 8:10 AM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: new home noises
>
>
>
>
> RE:
> The roof trusses were plated wood trusses - the energy
> calculations will not
> work for most homes out here in the desert that use steel roof
> trusses. This
> is why it is much more common to find metal stud homes with wood truss
> roofs, or in this case wood stud exterior walls, steel stud interior and
> wood truss roofs.
>
> Dennis:  If this house was made with mixed materials, might there
> not have been
> some differential shortening due to shrinkage of the wood?  That
> could certainly
> cause the trusses to load the interior partitions.
>
> I've heard that about metal stud construction in the desert
> before.  The energy
> calcs force the use of a larger sized A/C unit, which just
> crosses the line from
> the cheap residential units into the larger more expensive
> commercial units, and
> makes the metal stud construction noncompetitive.
>
> martin
>
>
>
> *
> *   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers
> *   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To
> *   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
> *
> *   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
> *
> *   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you
> *   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted
> *   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web
> *   site at: http://www.seaint.org


* 
*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
*   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
*
*   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
*
*   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
*   site at: http://www.seaint.org